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Episode 006: Maximizing Ministry Offerings & Creating Discipleship Pathways

Episode 006: Maximizing Ministry Offerings & Creating Discipleship Pathways

EPISODE 006: MAXIMIZING MINISTRY OFFERINGS & CREATING DISCIPLESHIP PATHWAYS

There are LOTS of resources your church has that can help minister to peoples needs at your microsite. Mingo and Esli draw the line between being a Savior and a vessel, and give some practical ideas for how to tether what already exists to your newly established microsite. Mingo also goes on a deep and personal rant on why we should NEVER “love on people” – but rather be very intentional about how we want to love people well. @micrositegirl & @micrositeguy

EPISODE RESOURCES

Check out the links & resources mentioned in this episode:

  1. Esli’s Instagram: @micrositegirl
  2. Mingo’s Instagram: @micrositeguy
  3. The Rock Church website: https://www.sdrock.com/

MEMORABLE QUOTES FROM THE EPISODE

DOWNLOAD THE TRANSCRIPT

Grab your reading glasses and download the PDF here.

EPISODE 006 FULL TEXT TRANSCRIPT

Mingo Palacios:

Welcome everybody to the Microsite Ministry Podcast. My name is Mingo and on this episode we’re going to talk about loving people well. Not loving on people. That’s the worst thing you can do, especially if you’re not in a church culture, and if I come to you and say, “You know what? You and your a eight year old daughter, I just want to -love on you.” You ruined it, right? That’s the worst thing you could say. So in this episode we’re going to talk about how to maximize your church’s major ministry offerings in a way that loves people well. We’re also going to talk about the best practices on how to grow the people that are at your microsite. That’s an intentional, purposeful way to love them well, not just generically love on them. My goal in this episode is for you to never say you’re going to love on people ever again. That’s my goal. Is everybody with me on this? Are you guys with me on this? I’m about to make a case. So, Esli, please tell me what are some of the ways in microsites currently that you know, how teams are maximizing their churches, major ministry offerings?

Esli Medrano:

So, the coolest thing about The Rock church in San Diego is that we have a lot of ministries. We have ministries that can help them with even a simple haircut.

Mingo Palacios:

Yes a haircut ministry, a thrift store, ministry counseling services, whether it’s like a pastor of the day where they just call for a prayer or it’s actually like a certified counselor that they can come and have scheduled time with.

Esli Medrano:

We have our thrift store, they can give us stuff for free for the people that come to microsites.

Mingo Palacios:

Or I even think of like worship gatherings, like special worship nights, membership classes. These are all ways that you can identify what your church has major ministry offerings are and then figure out ways that you can draw bridges to your micro-site, attendees, the members that are at your microsite.

Esli Medrano:

Yeah. And that’s one of the things that I always get that question from churches. They ask me, “So, you were thinking about keeping the people always at microsites and my answer is always no. Because I don’t want them to be on the street the whole time. As much as I love people coming to our microsites, I don’t want to have 1000, 3000 people come into microsites. I’d rather have less people and more people getting into to an actual campus. So I’d rather be the first experience they get in a church and then we take them into my office.

Mingo Palacios:

You could probably describe or you could imagine micro-sites as a gateway to the church. It’s an easy on-ramp to what the church has to offer programmatically and by membership. And don’t mind the noises. Just have the whole team eating lunch right now, which is OK.

Esli Medrano:

And I can smell it.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah. No, I’m excited. Pass some nuggets.

Esli Medrano:

One of the people that I love, his name is Andrew, that’s all I’m going to say, but he came as a homeless to one of our microsites and he was fed at a microsite, which no longer we do, but he was fed there, he was cared for and people loved him well enough and now he goes to one of our campuses and now he’s one of the security team members there. So that’s what we want to see and incorporate the other ministries incorporate the people that the services that we can provide as a church.

Mingo Palacios:

I do think that people often short change how they serve people. People think that it’s all up to them at their microsite to figure out how to solve everyone’s problem, and I teach this often, if you’re taking notes, write this down. You’re called to be a conduit of ministry, not a person’s savior. I remember so many people who they collapsed under the burdens of the people that were coming to their microsite because they felt like they needed to be their savior.

Esli Medrano:

I think that’s one of the big, big things that happened in microsites. You get to see people who have been abused. Once you start getting into their personal life and you get to see what they bring from the past, it’s really easy for you to lose your step and lose where you are supposed to be and you start thinking of yourself as Jesus and you’re still getting stressed out because you can’t fulfill their needs- what you’re never going to do.

Mingo Palacios:

No. You’re not a savior.

Esli Medrano:

No. And so you start losing who you are-

Mingo Palacios:

And what you’re there to do.

Esli Medrano:

Yeah and who you should be asking people to be focusing on, not on you because you’re not good enough and focusing on Jesus.

Mingo Palacios:

Take this as a note inside of this statement, because people who don’t have Jesus will only see you as their potential savior.

Esli Medrano:

Yes.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah. I need you to help me. I need you to move this. I need you to intervene. I need you to talk to my husband. I need you to talk to my family. I needed to get me a place to stay tonight, and I remember feeling the burden of that. There’s no way if you have a beating heart inside your chest, you can’t feel the burden, but you have to remember that you as a micro-site or there to give them an experience with Jesus not solve their problems, and I think that it’s a thin line because you have to address people’s problems. That’s what the church is there for, but if you burden yourself to death with solving every person’s problems, one, you’re not going to have an effective site. And two, you’re just never going to lead somebody. Remember the end goal is eternity for them. Not a place to stay tonight.

Esli Medrano:

And you’re not going to be effective at all. You’re not going to make a change.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah, that sounds really harsh and I don’t want people to take that the wrong way, but you’ll never be able to meet every need of every person. That’s just the bottom line. That’s the only person that that promises that as Jesus himself.

Esli Medrano:

And you have the different people that come to a church knowing that they are broken, but is it different people that you’re going to encounter in a microsite? For sure. You’re going to encounter people who are completely broken, they’ve been mistreated by church somehow, someway, or in their mind they’ve been treated wrong in their mind they’ve been abused by a church. So when they come in here, they think that you’re going to get something different than a church. In reality it is going to be different, but at the same time you have to remember that you’re not going to meet their needs. That’s not the right way to love people.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s good. There’s a, there’s a book called, When Giving Hurts, When Loving Hurts.

Esli Medrano:

Oh, um, yes. When Giving Hurts?

Mingo Palacios:

Bring it up. What is it? Is it When Giving Hurts? Teammates, Google it. When it actually works in reverse, when you think that you’re helping, but you’re actually doing more damage.

Esli Medrano:

Yeah. You’re enabling people.

Mingo Palacios:

When Helping Hurts. Look that book up. That’s a phenomenal book for anybody doing this ministry.

Esli Medrano:

I have it. I can see the cover in my head.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s a good one and it’s a fine line. Like I said, so I don’t want to get hung up on that too much. When we talk about loving people, the difference between loving people and loving on people, loving on people is usually what people say when they don’t know specifically what they’re going to do for the people they’re hoping to love.

Esli Medrano:

That’s true.

Mingo Palacios:

They just go, “I have no plan. I just want to love on people.”

Esli Medrano:

You can’t just love people-

Mingo Palacios:

I remember volunteers will come to the table. I go, why do you want to serve in this miss you? “Oh I just want to love on people.” Yeah, I go, “Well, go back and tell me what you want to do specifically when you come back with a specific way you want to engage in this ministry, then we’ll talk.” You have to do your due diligence to figure out how God made you. We call that shape. Your spiritual gifts, your history, your abilities, your personality, right? Those things make you who you are and you have to bring that to Jesus and say, “How have You equipped me to love people who don’t know You yet?” And I think that serving at a microsite, it has to be personal. It can’t be institutional. You can’t say, “Well, this ministry does this. I just do what the ministry does.” You have to say, “This is who I am personally. I’m good at talking to people surface level. I can get you to feel welcome. I’m quick on microphone. I should be a host.” You have somebody who’s I think of like Anita, right? She will stare into your soul.

Esli Medrano:

Oh she’s amazing.

Mingo Palacios:

She knows how to ask the kind of questions that get you to kind of speak what’s really going on. She’s not afraid to pray for you and the person that you came with in a way that you have a real experience with Jesus. She needs to be on the prayer team. Right?

Esli Medrano:

Yeah and she goes for people too.

Mingo Palacios:

And she’s loving people well. She never came to the table and said, “I just want to love on people.” She understood who God made her to be and she was using it particularly inside the lane of microsites. I understand who God made me to be. I’m using it particularly in the lane of microsites. Esli, you know who God made you to be when you come to the table, you come color-coordinated binders for everybody. You come with a timetable of how we’re going to use our time, any remind us that we need to be on our time, right? That’s a great steward of your gifts in the trajectory of microsites. If you have somebody coming to the table and say, I just want to love on people, your job is to turn them away and say, “Come back to me when you understand who God made you to be. And then we’ll talk about what you can do in this ministry.” That’s my conviction.

Esli Medrano:

Loving people is as easy as knowing their names.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s a great call.

Esli Medrano:

Knowing people is knowing who their spouses are. Knowing if they have kids or not. I’m a kind that takes notes, “Oh, you have a kid, OK, what’s this one kid’s name?”

Mingo Palacios:

Their birthday.

Esli Medrano:

Birthdays. Loving people well enough to just be able to say, “Hey, I remember what I prayed for you. How did that go?

Mingo Palacios:

How is that going? So, so, so important.

Esli Medrano:

Oh I remember the story that you told me about how was that?

Mingo Palacios:

Everything you’re saying Esli is all about specificity. It’s all about being personal. It’s all about being dialed in, not generically saying, “I just want to love on people.” For some tangible notes, if you’re taking notes in this podcast, ways that you can connect people to your church, major ministry offerings, if you’re doing a worship night, consider streaming it for your worship for your microsite community.

Esli Medrano:

Better yet, just take them all.

Mingo Palacios:

Bring them with you. I love that idea for if it’s possible and you can coordinate the transportation for everybody. Make the announcement on Sunday at your microsite, “On Thursday we’re having a worship night. If you want to be on a caravan that goes to the site, we can meet at a particular location. Maybe we’ll pick you up.”

Esli Medrano:

Of course the logistics have to work in your church and your insurance.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s why you bring your logistics person, all of that stuff.

Esli Medrano:

That’s what I’m thinking, insurance.

Mingo Palacios:

But if you got together with a bunch of people and you just said, “Hey, I’m going to bring a bunch of my friends to worship night.” No insurance needed for that. Be insured on your car. I think of like ways that we can help people who were under the standard of living cost of living like poverty stuff. We partnered with our church’s thrift store. We had a thrift store. We had vouchers and in a specified amount of money that between all of our locations we could ride vouchers for specific needs that people could go to the thrift store. I loved when we could send a team member with a person to the thrift store because the conversation that happened from the location to the thrift store and then from the thrift store back to the location that was so rich. It was their personal connection that mattered. Not the things that they got.

Esli Medrano:

So really, an intimate way to bond to someone like what their needs are, how they’re going to get their needs. Oh, I need pants. Oh here.

Mingo Palacios:

I remember one time somebody showed up at microsites with no pants. That was rough and I was like, “Hey, how about we get you some pants?” It was that basic. The need was that real. I mean, you laugh afterwards, but it was a real need. People always ask about benevolence.

Esli Medrano:

Always.

Mingo Palacios:

Do we give money? Do we give money? Do we give money? And I say, you should probably default to your church’s has benevolence policy. You shouldn’t take a special route as a ministry. Oh, we deal with people with great needs, therefore we need a special clause. You don’t ever want to be out of sync with your church. So you follow the same principles that your church rolls out. A lot of times, benevolence is held for people who aren’t members. There’s no reason why somebody at a microsite can’t go through the process of becoming a member. Figure out how to stream those membership classes. Again, figure out how to get them to come to a location. Those are ways that you can maximize your churches, major offerings to the people attending microsites.

Esli Medrano:

And a way to love your people. This is something that I’ve been struggling with because it’s easier for me to just stream like the membership class or whatever. You can, if you could stream everything else, you could but how better way would be to love your people, to take him to where the big churches are for them to experience that, hey, churches, not just on a street. Actually, why don’t I love you enough to take you to take you to a big-

Mingo Palacios:

There’s a lot more people.

Esli Medrano:

Yeah, let me love you enough so you can experience what our church really is about.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah that’s good.

Esli Medrano:

And how you can-

Mingo Palacios:

And give you a different view because a lot of churches that are engaging in microsites, they have a varied expression, different expressions of how the church gets together. You can love them by saying, “I want to show you a whole other whole new world of what this church has offered.” That’s a great segue as we wrap the last eight minutes of this conversation about best practices to grow the people who are serving at your microsite, right? So we have a commitment to shepherding the people that are volunteering to lead microsites. You love them well by discipling them. Well, there’s no other way around it. I mean, yes, you buy them, or yes, you get them starbucks card or yes, you carve out time in your schedule, but if you can disciple them to be better believers who eventually learn to disciple other people, you will have no better expression of love.

Esli Medrano:

It’s all about what Jesus did for us. Right? What did he do? He asks, come and see. Come and see what I’m doing. Come and eat. Let me, equip you. Let me feed you. Let me teach you. Let me educate you. Let me show you. Let me, let me introduce you to all this stuff, right? That was a common eat and then come and die. OK, now you do it.

Mingo Palacios:

Now it’s yours.

Esli Medrano:

Now it’s yours. I love you so much. Here, you go and have fun.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah. This is critical, especially for the leaders who loved to lead. The ultimate expression of a mature leader is for them to move out of the ministry. That’s what happened with us.

Esli Medrano:

Yeah. oh hey, we’re working on.

Mingo Palacios:

We’re working on the trailer that we’re streaming from. It’s awesome.

Esli Medrano:

Can you hear that?

Mingo Palacios:

If you heard that. It sounds backwards because my insecurities would say, you have to have me here. I built this. I’m the one that brought this all together. If you lose me, you lose the ministry. That’s the carnal flesh in us as Christians. I think by way of Jesus’s example and by some phenomenal leaders that happen to be in front of me when I was leading microsites, they challenged me over and over and over again, “Mingo. Mature enough to move out of the way, mature enough to move out of the way.” And what that will do is it will allow others to come to the table-

Esli Medrano:

Experience what you experienced.

Mingo Palacios:

And take it beyond what you can take it to. That’s where we have found our overlap, is that there was a pastor brewing in you that was never going to come to surface unless I moved out of the way and let you do that.

Esli Medrano:

Thank you for moving out of the way.

Mingo Palacios:

I’m happy to.

Esli Medrano:

This is the best way you’ve ever loved me.

Mingo Palacios:

And that’s the way that people should be listening. They should be thinking, how do I get out of the way? Literally so that other people who are committed to serving, remember these people are volunteering their time. Esli, you’re volunteering your time.

Esli Medrano:

Oh yeah.

Mingo Palacios:

And now it’s your job to figure out how you get out of the way so that the people that are serving along side of you that you’re holding up, they can move into the fullness of God’s call in their life. It doesn’t always mean professional Christianity, right? Jumping onto a church staff, but the opportunities are usually what mature us and develop us, right? It’s those experiences where you could take the win and everyone go, “Yay, Esli, unbelievable job. We knew you could do it.” Or you go, “You know what? I got four or five volunteers, man I would love for them to experience that.”

Esli Medrano:

I go back to servant leadership because maybe because I’m teaching it at The Rock School of Ministry, I don’t know. Servant leadership is all about giving your life so that others can find theirs. So that’s what I am trying to get the-

Mingo Palacios:

Giving your life so others can find theirs. So good.

Esli Medrano:

Yeah. I didn’t come up with that by the way.

Mingo Palacios:

You can say about.

Esli Medrano:

I can say that.

Mingo Palacios:

If you’re launching a microsite and you do not have a plan for discipling your friends or volunteers well, do not launch a microsite. You cannot decide that you’re going to disciple people later after you start the ministry. My posture, my personal belief is you start with the discipleship process and you let microsites be the excuse; you let microsites be the thing you do while you’re discipling your people. That has to be the way you flow your ministry.

Esli Medrano:

And that’s the structure and you can hear about it in episode two I think.

Mingo Palacios:

And yeah, and I’ll tell you this much too, I had a leader that was so bold he would say, “Mingo, you know what? You’re a great people net-er, you can net people together. You’re a terrible pastor.” Don’t mind all that grinding on the airstream is just being worked on for the next conference.

Esli Medrano:

But that’s how microsite it.

Mingo Palacios:

We’re just in the mix.

Esli Medrano:

We’re just ghetto like that.

Mingo Palacios:

Which don’t miss that statement. You can be a great people person. You can be somebody who can gather a crowd and you can be a terrible pastor. Jesus calls us all to be disciples and then disciple makers. You can’t be a disciple and not be a disciple maker because in the DNA of being a disciple is the multiplicity, the reinvesting in somebody else. That is part definition of being a disciple is to make disciples, so I’m all fired up about it because people think, “Oh we’ll just use sites to get more people. We’ll grow our thing. Our church will have more people. I’ll have a ministry with a lot of people.” And you’re missing the point. The point is to disciple people well.

Esli Medrano:

And that’s what we get also often with the volunteers like, “Esli, I need more volunteers.” Then ah, ring ding ding ding, you haven’t loved than people enough to say, “Come.”

Mingo Palacios:

Well. You haven’t loved them well.

Esli Medrano:

Well. Well and enough to say, “Hey, come over and let me show you what this is about.”

Mingo Palacios:

Watch. Come to my home. Watch what we do. See how we’ve wrestled with what we’re going to do next. Be a part of the pain in dealing with people’s personal lives. As we’re raising up this site.

Esli Medrano:

And when I say enough is a big difference with well enough but when you don’t love people enough, you don’t give them the chance to say, “Hey, I know you might not look like me, but you can get to where I am. Let me love you enough to say I love you enough for you to, you might mess this up-

Mingo Palacios:

You might lead this different than me and you might not lead it as well. Oh my gosh. Actually, I guarantee you that your volunteers will never lead as well as you will lead, but that’s to be expected until they get enough opportunities to lead. Think about how many times you’ve been given an opportunity to lead something. Of course you’re going to be better at it than a volunteer, but that’s your job is to give them enough experience, shepherd it well. I think of the Good Shepherd. We should talk about the Good Shepherd in another episode.

Esli Medrano:

Ok

Mingo Palacios:

But the Good Shepherd anticipates the flock and prepares a place for the flock so that they will get the most out of their time where they’re at. That’s our role as leaders in a ministry is to anticipate the volunteers, not just the people coming to consume off of the ministry, but to say, how do I prepare a place where they’ll consume and grow and feel safe? That’s our job is to protect them as leaders, to protect volunteers, to create an environment of development and growth. That’s how we shepherd well like Jesus. Not, “I have needs. You need to do them. I have chairs. You need to move them. We have site goals. You need to launch them.” That’s the wrong posture.

Esli Medrano:

Right. No and how Jesus loved. He showed, he fed, which means he invested, he educated and then he let you go for it.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s good. I love it. Well, Esli, thanks for helping us define what it means to love people well. I pray that our listeners after this episode will never say, “I want to love on people. Let it never be said again that I just want to love on people. Go back to scripture, if Jesus ever said, “Love on people.” I’ll take it all back. I promise you he didn’t. He loved people well, very specifically.

Esli Medrano:

Yes.

Mingo Palacios:

Also, thanks for helping us understand what it means to invest in a team once you’ve got one, that you don’t use them as slaves, but you serve them as a leader so that their experiences would be even higher, even more rich than your own.

Esli Medrano:

Yeah. You give up your life so they can find theirs.

Mingo Palacios:

I love it. Esli, thank you so much for giving us that perspective. If you haven’t subscribed to the podcast, you better be a subscriber. If you’re running microsites, I’m proud of you. If you are thinking about microsites and this conversation is helping you, don’t hesitate to reach out to Esli or myself. You can find me at, @micrositeguy on instagram. Just direct message me. Esli?

Esli Medrano:

@micrositegirl. Direct message too.

Mingo Palacios:

Easy. We would love to hear what it is that you’re up to and figure out ways that we can encourage you, if not, just by having a conversation over the phone. We love you guys. Thanks so much for listening. We’ll talk to you soon.

Episode 005: Locations – What You Must Ask and Count

EPISODE 005: LOCATIONS – WHAT YOU MUST ASK AND COUNT

Now that you have an idea for a location, you have some things to ask and count. It’s not what you might be thinking, but it’s a MANDATORY step in the process to launch a healthy microsite. Esli and Mingo draw from 7 years of combined Microsite Ministry experience, launching sites, and helping other churches launch their own sites too.

Instagram: @micrositeguy & @micrositegirl

EPISODE RESOURCES

Check out the links & resources mentioned in this episode:

  1. Esli’s Instagram: @micrositegirl
  2. Mingo’s Instagram: @micrositeguy
  3. The Rock Church website: https://www.sdrock.com/

MEMORABLE QUOTES FROM THE EPISODE

DOWNLOAD THE TRANSCRIPT

Grab your reading glasses and download the PDF here.

EPISODE 005 FULL TEXT TRANSCRIPT

Mingo Palacios:

I’m never going to disagree with you. Everybody knows you don’t disagree with Esli. So let’s get into the episode. Launching a site can be one of the most intimidating things in the process of doing a microsite. So, when you were actively leading microsite, did you ever launch a site pure from the ground up when you were on the ground Esli?

Esli Medrano:

Yeah.

Mingo Palacios:

So let’s, let’s go through the history of how you launched the site.

Esli Medrano:

Working with microsites you have the tendency of looking at spaces and being like, “Oh, here would be a nice place to have microsites. So it always happens that way when you work at microsite for so long. We started with a group of friends, “Hey, we’re gonna do this together as friends, as a ministry.” Back in the day was a hiking ministry, we would just-

Mingo Palacios:

Yes, I remember.

Esli Medrano:

We were just a bunch of friends that wanted to do something for the Lord that was more than just hiking. So we rallied some people and then we went and looked for a location after that. But the decision to have a church on Sundays with us, and it was like you said, intimidating, because you’re thinking, “Are people gonna come? Is anybody going to show up? How are we gonna do this? Who’s going to get the equipment?”

Mingo Palacios:

Right. I see what you’re saying there where you first have to leap over the mental hurdle that you’re going to start a church.

Esli Medrano:

Yes.

Mingo Palacios:

Beyond just a location. You are going through the emotional checklist of the fact that you are now going to begin a regular service for people to attend and it’s not just a one time event.

Esli Medrano:

And there’s responsibility too because you aren’t going to start a microsite every Sunday. So you want to have some sort of a responsibility in this sense say, “OK, I’m going to be there on Sundays. I can’t really miss Sundays. Am I ready to commit my Sundays?”

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah, that’s a big deal. While you’re talking, I’m going to move your microphone, but while you’re talking I’m going to do that. So I love that you started with the group of people. This was a mutual collective decision. It wasn’t like you mandated a location as a group, you decided, let’s start to find a place where we feel like the Lord would allow us to run a microsite. Walk us through that process, walk our audience through that process so that they can get an idea of how to approach the plate when they’re thinking about launching their first site.

Esli Medrano:

I’m so distracted by you right now. It was a process of, like you said, everybody agreed on this new adventure, you call it. Everybody agreed that we all had different strengths and we’re all going to use it together. So some of us were nicer than others. Some of them were smarter than others. So we try to use everybody’s strengths to get this team going. And so, and even the location, we all agreed on that location. So we all had the agreement of we’re going to do this together so we’re gonna put our two cents. Everybody’s going to put our two cents and really get this going. So it was more like an agreement, like let’s do this together as a family to see what happens. Am I answering your question?

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah. I think you’re answering the question right. I’m going to pull the principal out of the particulars.

Esli Medrano:

Yeah. Awesome.

Mingo Palacios:

It sounds to me like you assess the strengths of the people on your team. I’m guessing you probably asked the question, “Who do we know and what do we have access to?”

Esli Medrano:

Right. So when we got the team and it was like eight of us. We decided to figure out, OK where do we want to go? One of the team had already in mind, “Hey, I go to a coffee shop every Thursday and I see a bunch of people and there’s one park that’s near it and it was in Chicago Park in San Diego” and he’s like, “Hey, I wonder if we can have microsite in that coffee shop?” So we were like, “Huh, is it big enough?” “Yes, it’s big enough.” And we’re like, “Great, let’s go. Let’s all meet on a Wednesday night. And it was just see if we can get that going.”

Mingo Palacios:

Yes. Now we’re getting into the details so somebody has an idea of where a site could potentially be. They don’t go through the like, “Hey, we’d like to know if we can host a church service here?” You’re just doing research. You’re going and investigating. Miles talks about a process- count, walk, ask love, right? I’m going to assume that this is a part of that process. I love that model so much. You counted the cost. That was that mental checklist that you said. Miles uses it as like count the details around the space that you might be launching a ministry. I think that’s a hundred percent valid, right? Miles says, “How many coffee shops in the area? How many parks are in the area? How many churches are in the area? How many schools are in the area?” So that you get an idea of the data that exists around the area you might be doing ministry in. I like to add to that you count the mental, physical and spiritual cost, right? The commitment to going in every week. The commitment to owning a role on a team. The commitment to showing up no matter how I feel or what the weather’s like. That’s the mental costs, the count there. What you guys talked about going and scouting it out, that’s the actual walk part, right? That’s like we’re going to walk the area. You walk it, you don’t run it because it’s slow. You take a slow and detailed look at the space that you’re thinking about doing the ministry so you can get a full breath of what that place may look like once you start doing ministry there. That’s what you guys did.

Esli Medrano:

Yeah. Yeah. But and in that walking you also had to think of the people that you’re going to impact because yeah, the coffee shop was great, but when we got to the coffee shop, we realize, well really there’s no people around this coffee shop only the people that come. And it doesn’t mean that they’re going to come on a Sunday. So is there any people that you see that are active outside or are they any houses out there that you may want to go in and knock on doors?

Mingo Palacios:

I remember you and I leading when we had regional leaders and they had the idea, “Oh we have access to a parking lot.” Remember they were like, “Oh, we have access to a space.” And then because they had access to it didn’t necessarily mean that it was a great space to launch a site.

Esli Medrano:

Right. It happens often.

Mingo Palacios:

Because we fail to do the walk part, the assessment, the slow assessment. We decided to make a fast decision because you have the possibility of launching a site doesn’t always mean that it’s going to have the potential of the greatest impact.

Esli Medrano:

So that’s why I said I don’t know if I disagree with you with location part because I actually like to say first you make the commitment you’re going to lead this beast.

Mingo Palacios:

So good.

Esli Medrano:

Second, you rally your people. You rally your friends or the ones that owe you a favor.

Mingo Palacios:

You stack hands right?

Esli Medrano:

Yeah.

Mingo Palacios:

You stack hands in the middle. You say it no matter what.

Esli Medrano:

And then the third is you go and look for those souls that you want to target and then the location. That’s why I said, I don’t know about the location.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s good. I just try to simplify it so that when people are taking notes, they’re like, cool get a team. Choose the lead.

Esli Medrano:

Yeah because in the so many years we’ve been doing this, I think I’ve found that it’s so difficult to go with a location.

Mingo Palacios:

Right.

Esli Medrano:

Because it’s like, OK, where’s the people? You do have an amazing location but the people around-

Mingo Palacios:

You could have an amazing location in death valley.

Esli Medrano:

Yes. Yes.

Mingo Palacios:

And not have a single person to reach.

Esli Medrano:

And you’re going to drive them nuts, you know? So I would rather have a location next to a dumpster, knowing there’s going to be people coming.

Mingo Palacios:

Which exists.

Esli Medrano:

This does exist. I’d rather have it next to a dumpster knowing that there’s going to be saved and impacted by the Lord.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah that’s so good.

Esli Medrano:

So that’s why I said, “I don’t know if I could agree with you” but it is the people. You want to go for the people. And I have tons of emails that I get during the week that say, “Hey, I have a great place where you could have a microsite.” And I’m like, OK, I go and see the place and there’s nobody around.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s good. Now how often as the site pastor do you roll the dice, that you gamble on a location and what does it look like to decide to try and then what do you use as measurements as you assess whether or not it’s worth staying or going? Because I know that there’s a spiritual development side on a team, so I love what you said about the team commits to the location, assessing the potential people that it can impact. But if you go and nobody comes, I think of some of the parks that we’ve run microsites in and for weeks and weeks and weeks, people are measuring you. They’re looking at you from the outside saying, I see what these people are doing. I’m not sure it’s for me. I’m skeptical of whether or not they’re going to even be here next week or not. Right.

Esli Medrano:

Yes. It happens often with the homeless.

Mingo Palacios:

The homeless community certainly is a tough one to break into, but I believe there is a growth opportunity for the team and committing to being somewhere despite whether or not people are coming or not. I always tell people, you celebrate the fact that you started not the number of people that are sitting in the chairs.

Esli Medrano:

Often, often we have moments where they’re like, “Ah, same people again, same 20 people again, no new people”

Mingo Palacios:

No new members,

Esli Medrano:

No new members.

Mingo Palacios:

No new visitors.

Esli Medrano:

So some people are like, “Ah, Esli again, we have the same amount of people.” But you don’t know what the Lord is doing. So I really rely, um, it’s going to sound really Christianese peeps but I really rely on the Holy Spirit, because the Holy Spirit tells you is it a good move is not a good move or you should stay or not. I just got a text message from one of my teams are like, “We really wanted to quit until we saw that we had five people.” Five people, of course. I mean the team is four.

Mingo Palacios:

It seems skinny, right? The team of four and five people attending.

Esli Medrano:

And it’s like “ah”, you know, and I actually considered messaging me like, “Hey, Esli like we should just leave here.” There’s no, there’s no-

Mingo Palacios:

Shut it down.

Esli Medrano:

Yeah, let’s kill it. And then there’s one guy that came, one guy that accepted the Lord, so they’re like, “Forget it Esli. We’re just going to continue here.”

Mingo Palacios:

You know what’s so funny is I always felt like it was a reasonable ask when you had a team of four or a team of six and let’s say maybe you had four or five people attending that you commit to loving those four or five, like it’s 40 or 50, right? I’ve heard it said from some great leaders that you do for one, what you wish you could do for everyone. Right? So if you have four or five people, you make that service the best you can deliver. The hospitality meter can be way up when you’re only serving four or five people. You can be very specific about how you take care of the people coming to your microsite when it’s four or five. When it becomes 40 or 50, it becomes much more difficult to love that community specifically. So I say because a microsite is always an expression of the local church. It’s like the Costco samples of the product that’s on the shelf behind it.

Esli Medrano:

I love that.

Mingo Palacios:

So what you want to do is you want to be really, really responsible. You want to be totally committed to those four or five because the taste that they get is going to be the evidence of the people that they’re going to bring, right? They’re going to decide whether or not they want to bring a friend or their wife or their brother or their kids or their neighbor, and so if you treat four or five, like a disappointment, what makes you think that they’re going to believe that it’s a great thing?

Esli Medrano:

And what kind of Jesus? I mean what kind of example? I mean, if you can’t handle five people, how do you want a 50-

Mingo Palacios:

How do you believe that 15 or 25 are going to come? That’s when people start to chase numbers in the microsite world.

Esli Medrano:

It’s dangerous.

Mingo Palacios:

And it’s upside down. I really do believe scripture is so clear, right? Faithful with a few trusted, with more, right? Faithful with a few. Faithful with a few. People were like, “Ah, there’s not enough people here. We don’t want to go all out. We don’t want to go. We don’t want to unpack all that we can because we don’t have enough here yet.” I think it’s the opposite. You unload as much as you can with who god brings to the table and you let him, you let him bring who he wants to bring. Rick says it really well. He says, “You’re responsible for the depth of your ministry and God is responsible for the breadth of your ministry.”

Esli Medrano:

Oh I love that. Oh Rick.

Mingo Palacios:

So good, right?

Esli Medrano:

Yes. I might use that.

Mingo Palacios:

So we have to be responsible. We have to be responsible for the depth and he’s responsible for the breadth. So launching a site, you understand that it’s not the place, but the people that matter when you’re deciding.

Esli Medrano:

Oh, that’s what happened with us in the coffee shop. We ended up going to the coffee shop, but we figured “Eh this is not really close to the people.”

Mingo Palacios:

Yes

Esli Medrano:

Let’s go across the street.

Mingo Palacios:

Into the park.

Esli Medrano:

Into the park.

Mingo Palacios:

And then you’re like, “Oh, there’s no power here.”

Esli Medrano:

There’s no power.

Mingo Palacios:

And there’s gangs here. There’s drive by shootings.

Esli Medrano:

There’s three gangs there. There’s drive-by shootings. Then we looked and we saw a barbershop.

Mingo Palacios:

Yes. I remember this.

Esli Medrano:

And then we just ended up being at that barbershop.

Mingo Palacios:

That barbershop was more of a connection to the people than the coffee shop was.

Esli Medrano:

It was.

Mingo Palacios:

And it didn’t seem like a barbershop would be a great place to hold a service, but your relationships with the people in that space-

Esli Medrano:

And that’s what the Lord really wanted to do.

Mingo Palacios:

Yes.

Esli Medrano:

The Lord wasn’t after the people in that park that we thought we were going for. The Lord was after the guys that were cutting hair in the barbershop.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s what I love. So what we think is going to be the greatest impact sometimes is not what the Lord is doing and we have to be very keen to lean on the Lord when we’re assessing those things. So we talked about whether or not you pay for a site.

Esli Medrano:

No.

Mingo Palacios:

Esli would believe because I think that we have the same heartbeat here. There’s plenty of free places to launch a site before you start paying for one, but if you’re working backwards off of a multi-site model, the inclination is, “OK, well how much is it going to cost for us to secure a building?” So let’s talk about this.

Esli Medrano:

So I always go with a no, and I always get the whole “Oh Esli but we have… this amazing. This is perfect.” Yes, but it’s not. I’d rather use that money for something else, like I’d rather use that money for someone that needs it for rent.

Mingo Palacios:

This is a principal.

Esli Medrano:

Mmm hmm. This is a principal.

Mingo Palacios:

This is a ministry principal. Money is not unlimited. I mean, yes, God owns the cattle on a thousand hills.

Esli Medrano:

Yes.

Mingo Palacios:

But if you’re watching the video, yes you’ll see cattle on a 1000 hills, but you have a finite budget. When you’re working on micro sites, chances are if you’re listening to this, they’re barely squeezing a little bit of money for you to try microsites.

Esli Medrano:

It’s really inexpensive to do microsites, but you still need to make sure that you are very-

Mingo Palacios:

You’ve got to manage a budget.

Esli Medrano:

Oh yeah.

Mingo Palacios:

I definitely know that there are some people that come to the tables so excited, so eager to go, “It’s only going to be $100 a month. It’s such a great deal.”

Esli Medrano:

“It’s nothing Esli.”

Mingo Palacios:

“They usually charge a thousand.” I think that you start backwards with what we just said. You measure the people potential, so if the people potential is high, then I would sacrifice the budget and then give it a time table to figure out if it’s actually going to reach and do what I believe it could reach and do. I remember we did this with the Alano club. So the Alano club was in AA facility. People came there to go through the Alcoholics Anonymous Narcotics Anonymous, 12 step program. There was already a built in community there and they were friendly with the church. Some of the people were members and attending the church, the East county campus. So when I went to go talk to the manager, he said, “Well you know, we usually charge x, y, z amount of money. I’d be willing to let you guys come in and try it for $50 a month.

Esli Medrano:

And then he forgot to charge it.

Mingo Palacios:

And then he decided not to charge us. Yeah. Whether he forgot or decided consciously, he forgot. I’d like to think that he blessed us. We went into an agreement there and it’s funny I committed to $200, so that would have been for four weeks, one month because it was $50 a week, it was $200 a month.

Esli Medrano:

This is where the holy spirit comes in again because you can have the best amazing plays where the Internet and the project is going to look clear and it’s going to be a really great way-

Mingo Palacios:

It has chairs.

Esli Medrano:

They have chairs you don’t have to set up.

Mingo Palacios:

There’s a roof over your head.

Esli Medrano:

There’s a roof so it if rains which it never rains in San Diego, but when it rains and then you have outside, you have a parking lot. There’s just enough it’s ok.

Mingo Palacios:

It’s got concrete.

Esli Medrano:

So it got concrete. There’s no cars that you need dodge. It’s ok. you kind of have to really put your heart into it. Like really? Do you want the comfort of another church?

Mingo Palacios:

That’s good. Do you want a feel like at church or do you want to be where the people could see?

Esli Medrano:

Where the people could see that something’s happening. That’s where maybe I sound like I’m very stingy and probably I am, but I rather not pay for that amazing location.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah because you can move those resources elsewhere. You can do something with the resources. I do think that somehow we just stumbled on something that’s a great principle, right? Do you want to be where people can see? That’s a missional and an outreach focus.

Esli Medrano:

Exactly.

Mingo Palacios:

Or are you just trying to create a space where you can move people into. That would be like a building.

Esli Medrano:

That would be another campus.

Mingo Palacios:

Eventually yeah it could convert to a campus, so that’s a strategy that people can deploy. If you want to start building campuses, you allocate some money. You secure a building that you can, you know, move somewhat into and then that becomes a part of the way that you expand the model and mission of your church. If you’re going to treat a microsite like a mission’s field, which I love, you’re going to try to make it viewable by as many people as possible. You want their curiosity factor to go up. The same reason people won’t walk into your churches is the same reason why people won’t walk into your microsite if it’s behind closed doors. I know this.

Esli Medrano:

Exactly. We’ve seen several homeless people were like, “Oh, I don’t know if I want to be in that building” but I’ll sit in this chair.

Mingo Palacios:

I’m happy to sit in this park because I sit in this park every day. If that’s a homeless focus, so be it, but we’ve got a lot of communities or neighborhoods that people are trained to reach by way of proximity. I was just on the phone with the church yesterday. They have 12 counties that they want to reach and they’ve got multisites in four of those 12 and they said financially it’s upside down for us to imagine being an all 12 of those counties. I said, “Put microsites at each of them and try them out. Figure out where the biggest population or the biggest potential reach is for people who are yet to experience the taste of your church’s brand.” Right? Remember like Costco samples that you get a taste of what your church brings to the table and then roll them out accordingly and maybe you don’t have a huge hit in one county. The nice thing about a microsite is that the equipment is mobile, so you can move it the same equipment to another county, test it out and go, “You know what? I like it here. I like it here better, better results, better return, better impact, better movement, all things better.” OK. So we went through how to launch your site, the process that you should go through to recap, count, walk, ask love, right? And we didn’t get to the ask and love part. Maybe we can set that for the second episode.

Esli Medrano:

Let’s do that.

Mingo Palacios:

Count and walk is what you should be deploying. When you think about launching your first sentence

Esli Medrano:

And the count also has a lot to do when you count on what, why, why is your purpose.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s good.

Esli Medrano:

Because there’s a lot of people that come to me, they want to start their own church and so they think, “Oh, I’m going to do a microsite.”

Mingo Palacios:

“I’m going to short track it through a microsite and I’m going to mean

Esli Medrano:

I’ve had tons of people telling me, “I want to preach, so I’m going to go to a microsite.”

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah, that’s not the vision.

Esli Medrano:

Not the vision. Wrong place. So, what is the count? What is it that you expect the Lord to do? What do you expect the Lord to do in you? What is your goal? What is your agenda?

Mingo Palacios:

That’s really good?

Esli Medrano:

Where are you going with this? Are you just there to be the one that’s getting the attention.

Mingo Palacios:

The face.

Esli Medrano:

Or do you want people to really know what the Lord is doing in your church? If you’re going to make this to be in your church, are you in love with your church enough? Are you in love with their pastor enough-

Mingo Palacios:

To multiply it.

Esli Medrano:

To multiply it so that everybody can hear what the pastor is saying?

Mingo Palacios:

That’s such a great question Esli. This is not a me display. This is a my church display. That’s really good. Esli, thank you so much for giving us that perspective. I always value you to death. I love that we get to now talk about the years of ministry that we did together for all of our listeners who want to follow along with what you’ve got going on in the ministry, you can be found at-

Esli Medrano:

@micrositegirl on Instagram

Mingo Palacios:

@micrositegirl on Instagram. You can find me @micrositeguy on Instagram. If you want to get even more nitty gritty you can find me at @mingo2 and

Esli Medrano:

@micrositegirl, you can see everything there. But really you can go to sdrock.com. I think we’re going to get a new website so just search us at sdrock.com

Mingo Palacios:

Microsites, chances are The Rock has influenced it if you find it, any other church. They’ve been around for a long time. To our viewers, love you. Hope your ministry is going well. I pray confidence over you and courage. I pray a spirit of unity with the team members that you’re gathering together as you determined to step out of the four walls of your church and I pray for your leadership that has to be with you in this project. Until next episode when we talk about asking and loving, let’s talk about that in the next episode. We’ll talk to you guys soon.

Episode 005: Locations – What You Must Ask and Count
Episode 004: Establishing a Location

Episode 004: Establishing a Location

EPISODE 004: ESTABLISHING A LOCATION

Locations are a critical component to Microsites, but where, how and why are critical questions to address when determining your space. Mingo and Esli talk through 5 years of helping teams launch locations and the wins you need to know to do it well. @micrositeguy & @micrositegirl

EPISODE RESOURCES

Check out the links & resources mentioned in this episode:

  1. Esli’s Instagram: @micrositegirl
  2. Mingo’s Instagram: @micrositeguy
  3. Facebook: @eslibonita
  4. Twitter: @eslibonita

MEMORABLE QUOTES FROM THE EPISODE

DOWNLOAD THE TRANSCRIPT

Grab your reading glasses and download the PDF here.

EPISODE 004 FULL TEXT TRANSCRIPT

Mingo Palacios:

Welcome back. If you are a regular listener, if this is your first time listening, welcome to the Microsite Ministry Podcast. My name is Mingo, your host. This is my dear and close friend, Esli Medrano who is a microsite pastor in Southern California at The Rock Church. And today, on this episode, we’re going to be talking about how to secure a free venue, not just make the ask, but to be a great steward of the opportunity. Let’s get into it. Thanks for tuning in and listening. Esli, how have you secured, what’s the conversation gone like between you and a venue manager or a venue owner in history as you’ve launched a free location for a microsite?

Esli Medrano:

I don’t know if it’s a Mexican thing and it can just bargain with anything.

Mingo Palacios:

The spiritual gift of bargaining. Yes. I remember some of the disciples had it. Yes, the spiritual bargaining.

Esli Medrano:

Not everybody has it. You just explain what you’re doing. You just explain. I have found that if you’re completely brutally honest at what you’re going to do, “Hey, I have no money. We want to do this thing in your parking lot. Is there any way we can just use your parking lot? Is there any way? Can we use your parking?” That’s the first thing that I ask is,

Mingo Palacios:

May we? Can We?

Esli Medrano:

“Can we use your parking lot?”

Mingo Palacios:

Is there a possibility? Can you imagine a possibility where?

Esli Medrano:

“It’s just for two hours, maybe three.” So you just keep going and ask.

Mingo Palacios:

So details. You come heavy handed with details.

Esli Medrano:

Yeah because you’re going to ask a big thing. You’re going to ask them to let you

Mingo Palacios:

Create space.

Esli Medrano:

I usually go with the hard ask. So if I want to go in via the event, can we use this event? Can we use this area for a microsite event?

Mingo Palacios:

Yes. Very specific.

Esli Medrano:

And I go for the biggest I can get.

Mingo Palacios:

Ok, so you’re like, I want to use your whole building. No, you’re not going to let me use your building.

Esli Medrano:

Ok then let me use your room right here.

Mingo Palacios:

How about this room inside your building. Oh No, not the room.

Esli Medrano:

Ok. How about your parking?

Mingo Palacios:

How about a parking lot? How about three parking spaces? So you’re saying make the big ask and parrot back according? It’s so funny-

Esli Medrano:

Mexican style.

Mingo Palacios:

I would do the opposite, I would go, I would ask for a little bit and then start to be faithful with that and then say, “Hey, do you mind if we…” I’ll use the family gym as an example. When we started the family gym, the location came to us. This is where I think, in the last episode we talked about like how do you even map out a location? You were really pastoral when you said set your sights on the people that you’ll be serving in, set your sights on the potential audience instead of just being wooed by the place. I thought that was so insightful. But once you get your location or you have an idea, a lot of times people go like, “How in the world do we even begin?” And I love to tell people, start with what you know, start with what you have access to. So if you’re at a church and you have a stage and a microphone, you can say to the audience in your service, “We’re looking at launching this thing called Microsites and while it may not make sense to you, here’s what we need a place to meet regularly, roughly two or 300 square feet, access to power, a place where we can store a few chairs.” Something that basic and then say, “Meet me in the lobby or meet me at the booth, or email me at info@microsites.com or info@yourchurch.” Whatever microsites@crossingchurch or info@hillsong, microsites@hillsongchurch.com. You know, I believe. And let people come to you as the Lord inspires them with what they might have to offer. And then you can use your time breaking down the best potential opportunity instead of going and hunting all these plays. Going and hearing 30 no’s before you find the one, yes. So I would say start with who you have access to and make the ask broad, but specific.

Esli Medrano:

I have found also, and again I’m going to get Christianese, but when you pray and you’re like, “God, I want to reach these people. Can you make a way?” That’s what happened with a barbershop that I was talking to you guys about the last episode is that we’ve suddenly we that it was like a “ah” moment.

Mingo Palacios:

Like a shining space.

Esli Medrano:

Yeah and we asked and they’re like, “Yeah of course.”

Mingo Palacios:

I do think that every time, if you saturate everything in prayer, and it’s in my notes actually with some of the materials that I give to churches is like saturate the process in prayer before, during and after because then you recognize God for the things that he’s providing. You say like, “Lord, we are going to begin the process of looking for a space. Go before us. Start working on the heart of the manager who owns the place that we are going to eventually be in.”

Esli Medrano:

If we get out of the way, let’s face it, you get out of the way, it works better.

Mingo Palacios:

So do you go in with the whole team?

Esli Medrano:

Nope. I try to just be me and someone else.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah that’s good.

Esli Medrano:

You don’t want to intimidate them.

Mingo Palacios:

This is a huge mistake that you can avoid. A lot of times you want to say, “Oh, well, maybe if we go in with the whole team, they’ll see that we’re capable and there’s people here that are backing it.” When I’ve launched a location and I was doing a cold ask, right? I remember there was a guy who went to our church and he was so well connected in downtown and he loved the idea of launching sites in several places. One person delivered low income housing unit, The Arlington, gave us access to a second low income housing unit, The Arthur, brought to my attention, a parking lot, grocery outlet, and got me connected to a bar, Taste & Thirst. One person brought me all of those different locations and he said, “Mingo, I can connect you to the manager, but you’ve got to close the deal.” So he teed me up but then it was my job to pitch the vision, be clear with the expectations, be clear with the asks, and then see what they would go for. So, when it came to me talking to the manager, I usually went alone. I usually brought something that gave me the legitimacy connecting me to the church. So if you’re on staff and you’re starting a microsite, you usually have to roll in with your business card, roll in with a proposal if you want to write a proposal. I never wrote a proposal. I only ever went in and just asked here’s what we want to do, very specifically, I want to test and see if your space would be a great place where we could serve the people in this community with the best of what we’ve got at our church. That looks like me bringing a projector, a sound system, some chairs, if it’s outside, a canopy. And here’s what I’m asking for access to a plug and access to your space, maybe an hour before the service and an hour after the service just to clean up. They would usually ask this question, “What’s the liability? How are you going to protect me from being liable from what you want to do?” Most people who are doing this ministry don’t realize that their church has an event insurance clause that will cover over one million dollars for your church to do something off of their property. Use that same insurance clause when you launch a microsite. So you can tell a manager who’s at a store, our insurance is actually going to extend over to your location when we’re doing something on your property. It’s all our insurance.

Esli Medrano:

Under the name of our church.

Mingo Palacios:

Exactly. That’s a huge thing. Executive pastors want to know, “How liable are we going to be when you start doing this out there?”

Esli Medrano:

There are some insurances that don’t feel very happy or comfortable with that but I mean, if your insurance is ok with that-

Mingo Palacios:

I’m going to say if you’re at a church that has coverage for your local location, it’s not too hard of an ask to say, “Can we extend that coverage when we’re doing an event?” And you have to be specific and say, “We’re doing it for three hours at this address on these days.” I remember having to write those.

Esli Medrano:

This is how many people there might be.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah. And these are potentially how many people. Usually that’ll get you the permission legally to cover yourself when you’re out at another place. So have you ever run into a skeptical property manager and how did you talk them into letting you do a micro-site there?

Esli Medrano:

I had one person and it was like, “No, no, no thank you.” I’m like, “Really? Wait, let me show you what it looks like. I’m going to show you pictures and how it is.” “Well, I don’t know. Let me talk to my manager. Let me talk to the owner. Let me talk to-” You know, you always have that one person that he needs to talk to.

Mingo Palacios:

Somebody above them.

Esli Medrano:

Yeah. The more that you show them, the more that you bring in, the more that charm-

Mingo Palacios:

Charm. Charm. Charm. You got to have somebody who’s got the gift of woo.

Esli Medrano:

Yeah you can’t really just send anybody.

Mingo Palacios:

It’s one of those strength finders, right? Winning others over. Somebody who can, my mom says, “Sell ice to Eskimos” Somebody who can just get you to buy into it.

Esli Medrano:

And really, you need to know what you’re doing too.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s so important.

Esli Medrano:

If you don’t know what a microsite is and you don’t know-

Mingo Palacios:

Go back to episode one on this podcast, but then you have to be clear. You should try to pitch to people that you’re friends with or people that you’re in ministry with. Practice your pitch so you don’t sound stupid when you’re trying to explain what it is you’re trying to do, because the less confident you are in trying to pitch it, the less likely they’re going to let you use their space

Esli Medrano:

And when you encounter that person that you’re going to ask, you’re going to figure out what kind of person is that? You’re going to have to figure out how to read that person.

Mingo Palacios:

Are they leaning in? Are they eager? Are they listening?

Esli Medrano:

Are you going to do the whole thing that I’m asking. Am I going to ask for the big, big room? Am I going to ask for the three parking spots? Where am I going to go? Which tactic am I going to go with? You can’t just go with my tactic all the time. You might have to go-

Mingo Palacios:

Well, it’s a part of reading the scenario. Again, if you start with somebody who knows somebody, I was thinking about this one person shout out, Kevin Petrocelli. Kevin was the one who went and said, “I’m friends with all these people. I’ll connect to you” in some ministry models they called that a person of peace, right? That person had gets you access to all these other locations. Kevin worked for a property management company that managed all these low income housing converted hotels. So there were mountains of people together in these converted hotels that were now apartments, but they had no community. So he said, “You know what? The best thing that happened to me and my family was this church. And so if you could bring this church to these places, I think you’re going to be the best for these people.” And that’s how we got into all of these low income housing units. It gave us the confidence to go and speak to more and more managers because we had a track record and almost like a sales team that were the guys I would send to go land a spot. Robert Cortes became one of the people that I would send out to go lock a location down because he knew how to sell. He knew how to get somebody to buy into an idea without really having much to promise on the other end. I would say this also, that you want to incorporate them into the ministry. So, you’re not just using their space, but you’re incorporating them into the ministry that you’re hoping to accomplish also. They’re as much a part of the pioneering as you are. Right? You’re bringing the ministry, but they’re providing the space so there’s an equal portion of involvement there and it’s your job to show them or to communicate to them that they’re part of what the Lord is doing also. I remember talking to some owners of a gym and saying, “You guys, by letting us do this, you’re positioning yourself as a partner in what God is doing and that’s big.” I think people want to be involved in something that God is doing if they’re believers. If they’re not believers, they’re super skeptical. So this was the bar that we went into and the bar was like, “You want to do what here? You want to launch a church service on a Sunday morning.” And it was funny because they wanted people. They wanted business. And in a weird way not to blur the lines, I said, “I’ll bring plenty of people to your establishment. I just want to know that you’ll give me access to your space.” Because right across the street was one of the biggest drug dealing hotels in downtown area. So I wanted proximity to the hotel. I remember I couldn’t get into the hotel. So I set my sights on the bar across the street, a place where lots of the people from that hotel went and dealt with their wounds.

Esli Medrano:

But see how you had targeted that hotel?

Mingo Palacios:

Targeted the people.

Esli Medrano:

You targeted the people.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah. And then the sell for the guy, it was just, “Hey, we’re going to use a small place in your bar.” He’s like, “Can I drink? You know, can I have customers who are being tended on?” I said, “Yeah, I don’t want you to shut your business down. We’re the guests here, so whatever you’re willing to share with us we’ll be happy to take.

Esli Medrano:

And it’s probably blowing peoples’ minds right now where they’re probably saying, “You have a microsite where there’s beer drinking?”

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah, I know, but those are the people need Jesus.

Esli Medrano:

That’s how God works.

Mingo Palacios:

Those people that need Jesus.

Esli Medrano:

People got saved in that place.

Mingo Palacios:

A bunch and some people were on their last leg of life at that site. I remember one of our volunteers, Sammy Staats, had made a connection to a very old alcoholic who had been disconnected from his family. He was living at that hotel and that was his local bar. He met Jesus in that bar, gave his life to Jesus there, and then as he passed away, we never saw him again. His daughter came to collect his goods. She had not talked to her daughter for months or she had not talked to her father for months. She got a call that he had passed away while she was going through his things, she found a Bible with the church notes that he gave his life to Jesus and Sandy’s phone number. She, his daughter, calls Sammy and says, I don’t know what you did or who you were with, but my dad gave his life to Jesus in a very difficult time in his life. I’m just so thankful that you guys were where you were when you were there.

Esli Medrano:

So this is where we have to think about that religion mindset that we have where you think, “Oh, a bar is not going to be a good thing.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s not a holy place.

Esli Medrano:

It’s not a holy place. How are you going to bring the church into a place like that? And then as we live that story, we remember-

Mingo Palacios:

This is why.

Esli Medrano:

This is why.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah, I love there’s a saying, I think Winston Churchill said like, “I would rather not be in a cathedral. I’d rather set up a tent 10 feet from the gates of hell.” Who used to put that on a one of our volunteers is to put that on his emails. One of our microsite volunteers, he said, “I’d rather be within 10 feet of gates of hell with a tent then in the shiniest cathedral because that’s where the people who need Jesus the most are.” So, to recap principles, right? You want to determine on your team who has the ability to sell the vision and you want to send them in. And it doesn’t have to be a senior pastor. It oftentimes is not going to be the senior pastor that’s going to be you.

Esli Medrano:

A normal person.

Mingo Palacios:

A normal person going respectfully. And I’ll tell you what you learn how to receive a “no”. Because I went through several locations where they were like, “Yeah, no.”

Esli Medrano:

You know what the funniest thing is that now that I’m a pastor, now that my thing is being a pastor. So when I get to the ask part, when I get to the owner, “Well, what do you do? What do you do for the church? Oh, nothing. I volunteer.” I actually, I am. When I used to say, I was able to say, “Well actually I’m a therapist with kids with autism, but I volunteered this church and we’re going to do this.” I got more “yes’s” than-

Mingo Palacios:

Does it help to be a volunteer?

Esli Medrano:

Oh yes. So if I say, “Oh, I’m actually the pastor at microsites.” “Oh.”

Mingo Palacios:

That’s really interesting. Send the volunteers, send the volunteers. I love that.

Esli Medrano:

It’s really funny.

Mingo Palacios:

But you have to get in there and try it yourself because you need to know what it feels like first to get rejected.

Esli Medrano:

The rejection. Awesome.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah. So good for your soul.

Esli Medrano:

It humbles you.

Mingo Palacios:

So yeah, that’s the ask part and I think that it’s important to remind your volunteers who now get to occupy a space. If you get a yes, they have to treat that place 10,000 times better than any ministry space they’re used to. It’s a part of your witness, not just to the people that you’re hoping to serve in your microsite, but to the people that are letting you be in their space. You’re just as much of a witness in that light as you are to the people who are coming and listening to the sermon. Have you ever experienced a failure in the team taking care of a place? Did you ever have to cover that?

Esli Medrano:

We had that one microsite, I’m sure you remember.

Mingo Palacios:

No names.

Esli Medrano:

No, it’s just one microsite that if we placed books the wrong way. There’s some micro-sites that are very picky.

Mingo Palacios:

The locations are so peculiar. Particular.

Esli Medrano:

Particular and sometimes we believe that our team didn’t do anything wrong, but then we had to like phase the management and we’re like, “Oh, sorry, we didn’t mean to mess up this one.”

Mingo Palacios:

Always lead with the location is always right.

Esli Medrano:

Oh yeah.

Mingo Palacios:

If you’re finding yourself defending against a location manager who’s giving you access to that space for free, you really need to rethink what your presence is like there.

Esli Medrano:

Yeah. It’s the whole being servant. You are a servant leader and that’s what we always talk about in microsites is that you being a servant leader, you go there with your humbling butt you tell them, “Oh, we’re sorry we move your books. Sorry.”

Mingo Palacios:

You have to come as a servant.

Esli Medrano:

You know you had to come with that servant/slave attitude.

Mingo Palacios:

And that you will lead well, you’ll lead the repair or you’ll leave the next time or the next round if you’re presented that opportunity better. So you’re not just going to be like oh passive, “I’m sorry, hopefully we don’t do it again.” But you rise as a leader and say, “Everything in my control as much as I can do to manage and steward what you’re giving us, I’m going to steward it well.” And a lot of times that requires you to show up. You. And make sure that it’s good before they closed the door and walk out.

Esli Medrano:

Yeah.

Mingo Palacios:

So that’s ask. We’re talking about a four part process to securing a microsite location. Count, walk was what we covered in the last episode. This is ask, right? What are the questions we need to ask ourselves as we’re asking for free space or a location to meet? What are we asking of the venue? What are we asking of our teammates? And what are we asking by way of commitment over time? I always told people just experiment with it because they were always so afraid of the long-term commitment. They were like, “How long are you going to be doing this here?” And I try to pitch a vision that says, “Would you be willing just to experiment to see if it would take off?” I remember meeting at a boutique downtown. We were on their roof and it didn’t, in a weird way, it didn’t make sense, but I thought, “Oh my gosh, it’s so awesome to have a rooftop service.”

Esli Medrano:

You were for the location.

Mingo Palacios:

I was for the location. Totally. You know, I look back on it-

Esli Medrano:

You need to listen to last week.

Mingo Palacios:

You’re right. Esli, I submit to you. I love the idea of a rooftop location. So I said, “Would you just try it for two weeks? I just want you to say yes for two weeks.” And whether or not we get a draw. And it’s funny because we drew people because of the allure of being on a roof top. I remember the photos were tremendous.

Esli Medrano:

I remember that.

Mingo Palacios:

The ministry was so minimal because it was not, it didn’t have any organic attendees.

Esli Medrano:

You got a lot of likes on Instagram right there.

Mingo Palacios:

Esli, you’re convicting me to death. The motive is so important. It’s so important. Yeah. Next episode we’re going to talk about loving specifically.

Esli Medrano:

Loving on people?

Mingo Palacios:

We’re talking about not loving on people, but loving people specifically. This is our call to ministry and microsites is to love people well, not to love on people. Thanks for listening. Esli, if people want to hear and see you, where can they do that?

Esli Medrano:

@micrositegirl on Instagram. Esli Medrano on Facebook.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s great. And they want to ask you questions, they can email you too?

Esli Medrano:

Mingo Palacios:

microsites@sdrock.com. Yeah I got your back.

Esli Medrano:

I keep saying it wrong.

Mingo Palacios:

It’s OK. If you want to follow along with me @micrositeguy or any of the channels, you can just google, Mingo Palacios. You’ll find all kinds of garbage. Thanks for listening. I hope that this is going to treat you and your teams well. I hope that this is going to be something that serves you as you continue to work out the process of doing and launching microsites. We’ll talk to you guys next time.

Mingo Palacios:

TEXT HERE

PERSON #2

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Episode 003: Working Online Viewers Into Your Existing Strategy

EPISODE 003: WORKING ONLINE VIEWERS INTO YOUR EXISTING STRATEGY

What assumptions have we held onto that 100 streaming churches have proven wrong? Jay details the potential that is stored up in an online campus. We learn the pathway from Community to Core, and how pastoring people online helps drive them to deeper levels of belonging.

EPISODE RESOURCES

Check out the links & resources mentioned in this episode:

  1. Instagram: @jaykranda
  2. Twitter: @jaykranda
  3. www.jaykranda.com

MEMORABLE QUOTES FROM THE EPISODE

DOWNLOAD THE TRANSCRIPT

Grab your reading glasses and download the PDF here.

EPISODE 003 FULL TEXT TRANSCRIPT

Mingo Palacios:

Welcome to the purpose driven Church podcast where we sit down with leaders in and around the church to discuss current trends and challenges and how the five purposes of the local church matter today more than ever.

Mingo Palacios:

Welcome to the purpose driven podcast/ this is a coming together of not just the PD podcast that we typically host, but also like a unique little sliver of the micro-site podcasts that we’ve been having this conversation over the last couple of episodes aiming at how do we engage the online community if your church is streaming via Facebook or some other proprietary method. We’ve been trying to address the fact that there’s an opportunity and for a lot of churches there’s a big miss when it comes to just streaming your services. And how can we be better owners, better shepherds of that opportunity. Today in studio. I’ve got Jay Kranda. Jay, welcome to the studio. Jay is the pastor of online experience, the pastor of the zeros and ones. Much like your title and much like the ambiguity of what online church looks like, you’ve had to do a lot of pioneering and a lot of, I would say sleuthing as you represent Saddleback and the strategy-heavy entity that is Purpose Driven. Jay, why don’t you introduce yourself and give us just a tad bit of a roadmap on how you arrived at the online pastor for Saddleback.

Jay Kranda:

Yeah. I always tell people it’s not something I went to seminary for.

Mingo Palacios:

Yep. Absolutely.

Jay Kranda:

Yeah. And a lot of my seminary professors were kind of just fully disagreed. Like that’s not possible at all. So, for me, you know I grew up in Southern California my entire life. I’ve lived in a couple of different places, but for the most part I found myself at a church in high school. I’m in Bellflower and I was part of a kind of a church that was doing PD actually. And I was a youth pastor. So actually the first time I encountered church it was a purpose driven church that was doing purpose driven youth ministry. And I actually read, for those who are more familiar with purpose-driven, I read, Doug Fields’ book before I even read Pastor Rick’s book that was very much aware of the purpose model. So a lot of my early framework of how I do church was actually shaped early on by PD. And I really believed in and what I always kind of loved about that was I loved the health kind of metrics where you were able to easily see-

Mingo Palacios:

A focus on healthy ministry of healthy pastor, the congregants.

Jay Kranda:

So I never really considered it purpose driven. All I really just was like, oh, here, here are the five things from the great commandment, the great commission, and it’s a great way to measure health from a church from myself and all that. And so I did youth ministry. It was a smaller church, so they hired one of my friends and my senior pastor told them, ‘hey, we’re not going to have a job for you after college and so you better start looking somewhere else.’

Mingo Palacios:

The news, everyone’s been really serving diligently and unfortunately when you graduate we ain’t gonna have a spot for ya.

Jay Kranda:

I know. I know. I’m like OK, I gotta move and figure out. And this isn’t fully true, but it’s like when you’re at a church and I think anybody who has tried to get a job or especially if you’re working at a smaller church, you’re kind of a big fish in a small pond

Mingo Palacios:

Totally.

Jay Kranda:

And then you’re like trying to figure out does anybody else know about this pond? And you start putting stuff on your resume and it means nothing to any everybody else. So anyways, I interned at Saddleback, had an opportunity a friend came on staff and said, hey, why don’t you just intern with me your last year? I was going to Biola. So, my last year of my degree there. And it led to a ministry opportunity where I was the communications ministry manager, which meant that under the communications team, you know, the joke was at the time was you had all these creatives that didn’t know how to manage people. And so they wanted to hire more of a pastoral

Mingo Palacios:

Somebody who had ministry experience.

Jay Kranda:

Yeah. I mean, I didn’t really have that much. I had a lot of youth ministry experience. But yeah,

Mingo Palacios:

Small pond, big fish, small pond, big fish.

Jay Kranda:

So, they had a web ministry. They had a writing ministry. They were soon to have a social media ministry that I started when I came on staff.

Mingo Palacios:

Interesting.

Jay Kranda:

And one of those things was the Internet campus and it was kind of this thing that was there and nobody was really doing much with it at the time. There was some vision early on, a lot of it was around offering a way for members who traveled because we, our position, our church, saddleback is positioned in a place where Orange County people are traveling all around the world. They wanted people to watch the services. So we were streaming video, uploading notes, all this stuff. We were doing that, you know, pretty much since, I want to say 2007 2008.

Mingo Palacios:

I heard at our staff development day, rick was talking about how Saddleback was the first church online ever. That’s such a bold statement to say I was like, ‘is that tried and tested?’ But you’re saying since like the nineties,

Jay Kranda:

If you go to the way back time machine, you can actually see our first website and it’s very pink, very retro.

Mingo Palacios:

A lot of salmon,

Jay Kranda:

A lot of salmon. It makes you want to fish.

Mingo Palacios:

All that to say though that Saddleback has been in the arena of streaming or presenting their content in an online format for a long time. So there’s been a lot of errors, a lot of bumps in the road, and a lot of developments that have helped us shape our culture, our philosophy of what it means to do online church now for those people who aren’t familiar the purposes or the crowd to core or the crowd to commissioned philosophy. And really it starts back at community. A community would be like your town, your city, the area, the geographic area by which your church sits inside of. Saddleback identifies those folks yet to engage with your church as the community at large. It has strategic methods or it has strategy to move people closer and closer and closer to what would be considered the core and then eventually commissioned would be like the bullseye because that’s when you send people back out into their own community or you send people out to, you know, other areas think missions, both local and global. So, where does something like an online campus or in my own book, a running microsites. Where does that strategy fit in to the larger movement of moving people in and growing a healthy church?

Jay Kranda:

Yeah. So, the thing that online ministry immediately disrupts really is for most churches the community is people who live within a 15 mile radius because the idea is that a core person will drive at great length, but your friend won’t. So really your community has a 15 mile race for the most part. And so online, the disruption is, well, if I just give them a link to our service, there is no restriction. So what do you do now?

Mingo Palacios:

Instantly? The barriers are removed.

Jay Kranda:

Yeah, it’s removed. So there’s going to be some restriction on who your church best reach for sure. Like the persona of that ministry. But for us there’s definitely been an evolution of where to place it. And actually that’s something that I respect from Saddleback highly. Rick talks a lot in PD church that he didn’t want to be a televangelist and when the Internet kind of started doing this whole streaming stuff, there was this auto kind of like, lets us replicate the strategy online and you know, there’s pros and cons to that. And what happened was there was like, oh hey, but with online, with Internet ministry, whatever you want to call it, you can have a deep engagement. So, everyone goes through this, you’ve got 1.0 where websites are static and you’ve got 2.0 where there’s actually social engagement and when the 2.0 kind of Internet got introduced in experience with things like Facebook and so forth, that it was like, Oh hey, that’s actually something that’s not just-

Mingo Palacios:

There’s potential here.

Jay Kranda:

So a lot of people are really good at dispensing information, which is what 1.0 it really was about. It was just a static pdf brochure. But 2.0 showed, oh look, there’s some community there. And when Saddleback first launched the website, I was like five years old. And so by the time 2.0 Internet came along, that’s when there was a lot of questions like, oh, maybe we can experiment with some stuff. And so early on that’s why the ministry fell. Actually to my knowledge, a lot of the early stuff actually fell on kind of the broadcast kind of area. And so there’s a lot of worship. It was just like, hey, let’s just echo our worship experience. So it sat there and then as it evolved, one of the things we started to do was, this was not me, but this was Steve Gladen and a couple other people they put it under fellowship. And for a long time, the way they treated the online ministry, which I thought worked for all sorts of reasons, but they treated it kind of like an affinity. Like the same way you treat a singles pastor, a marriage pastor of women’s ministry.

Mingo Palacios:

Like a bolt on to core ministry.

Jay Kranda:

And the reason was because we had one large campus. And the idea is that we can kind of, hey, let’s just kind of reach it this way. And really a lot of my job early on when I first got hired in the role was I was just a small groups pastor. And the idea is that I had an online venue. And so it was like, hey, people are watching online. I’ve got to get them into a small group. And so Monday through Friday, most of my job was around-

Mingo Palacios:

Clicking away, hammering away, and getting people connected to physical groups.

Jay Kranda:

And I also knew somebody who’s part of Saddleback, because I know that if I want to scale my care, I want people doing life with other people. If I can get them in a small group, wherever they’re at with a couple other people, then hey, no longer online church, that’s just church. So we had them just under fellowships over a long time. We were kind of under that model. Now we’ve evolved quite a bit now because a couple of things. First off you can do a lot more on the Internet now and of course-

Mingo Palacios:

It’s so much more engaging. There’s more options, there’s more connectivity and there’s more people watching.

Jay Kranda:

Yeah. And it’s just crazy the amount. When we first started doing stuff years ago we had 500 people watching every week. I have a Facebook group for my online community with 4,000 people. And that’s just the difference of growth and it’s actually people were actually able to interact with each other without me engaged.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah. It’s not one to one anymore. It’s. It truly is become peer to peer. So people are connecting to other viewers, other spectators, other engagers in it no longer requires a pass-through from the pastor or the host.

Jay Kranda:

Which for a long time we were the bottleneck because we did have to facilitate a lot of that connection and because of privacy issues and all that stuff. But now, we’re still trying to figure out some things. So anybody’s watching it’s like I don’t know and actually we’re gonna we may talk about it, but I did this survey with 100 churches asking them those doing online ministry, what do you think? How does your leadership feel about this? Ninety one percent said, ‘we like it but we’re not sure how to integrate it into our strategy.’

Mingo Palacios:

So good! That should be a huge pressure release for anybody listening is you might have it and it might be even working somewhat well according to what you want it to do. Ninety one percent are still trying to manage the best potential place for it. They’re still trying to determine where it fits best. I would say from the conversations I’ve had with some from my executive leader, David, Shaun, a mutual person in both of our circles, he always saw it as a pathway or like a gateway from people on the farthest outside to make one step closer to actually make their way into the crowd. Right? Hey, I’ve come check this out. I love what that represents in a certain sense. I love that somebody, if you think of a church that has zero online presence, they can’t even search you. Right? They couldn’t even get past just your general website. I’ve done this as I’ve gone and looked at certain churches, I want to know what their building looks like. I want to know what their community is, what it kind of looks like reflected by photos or videos that I can find online. And sometimes when there’s nothing, I’m super suspect, right? I’m like, do you even exist? Unfortunately, that’s kind of where we are right now. Whereas if you don’t have a footprint, if you don’t have a digital footprint or a thumb print somewhere online, if you’re not contributing to that, anybody can declare who you are. Unfortunately, most times, in most cases, it’s really those that are unsatisfied with what your church is doing that will have the loudest voice. So you have to be responsible for speaking something into existence in a digital form. Correct?

Jay Kranda:

Yeah, and you know the funny thing is Rick talks about in Purpose Driven Church that he says that’s one of the reasons why Saddleback, when they ended up building the worship center, they had glass doors and windows inside because the idea is that they knew most people, more and more people are unchurched and unfamiliar with the culture of what Christianity is about. And that’s framed by whatever they’re watching. It’s like the character, the Christian character or modern family or that Christian person. Yeah.

Mingo Palacios:

Whatever’s represented. Correct?

Jay Kranda:

Yeah. And so the idea is that they, he wanted people to be able to look in safely and not think like we’re sacrificing goats or something. You know what I mean? So, that’s why my petition to most churches is if you’re thinking about online ministry or you’re trying to figure out how to position it, I would position it right off the bat. One of the easiest things is with your first impressions ministry. Just think of it as, as kind of this megaphone to your existing strategy. So put it there and make the connection. I actually think that’s one of the number one misses is that usually if I’m talking to somebody who’s doing it, it’s hey, think about how does somebody move from that online as pastor David Shaun was talking about there is how do you move somebody who’s watching online to physical? I call it online to offline even making the connection of, if you have your next step card, have things like how’d you hear about us and make sure, hey, if you show up, go out to the patio we have a gift for you. And making special calls to the people watching. Hey, by the way, we’re, hey, we’re right here. We’re in this city in Long Beach or we’re here in San Diego. We’re here in wherever and making that connection in. One of the things that I think a lot of people do is because Facebook live, for example, has made streaming reachable for everybody, it used to be like years ago, we were spending like $4,000 a month just on streaming and now-

Mingo Palacios:

Totally. You can hold your cell phone up and have an hd signal running from any place at any time.

Jay Kranda:

Yeah. It’s crazy, but even in that if a church’s streaming, something that we do when we Facebook live is we put a link to our website and we say, hey, to learn more where we’re at, or to access the message notes, go here. So Facebook live is great for exposure to struggle with Facebook live is kind of a retention.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah, it’s, it’s user interface. It’s UI is shallow when it comes to being able to disseminate more information about you and your church.

Jay Kranda:

Yeah, and they’re working on that because they’ve got stuff like, you know, AirPlay and Chromecast built in. They got the Apple TV APP and they’re trying to throw, you know, they got the whole watch tab there. They’re working on that strategy. But for sure making the connection of like, ‘hey, by the way, go here’ kind of like a ‘plan a visit’ type of thing.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s great. That’s a great way to actually consider it. For anybody running an online strategy. Think of the ways by which somebody is going to decide to come. Right? And aim your efforts at that because it’s easy for you to put a link out there for anybody to click and watch, but are you being responsible with the ways by which they can dive deeper and they can inquire for more and there’s some really basic ways. Most of the time we’re just trying to mind info, right? Give me your email address, your social, but if you can give, give, give, give, give people more channels and more opportunities to arrive physically. Whether that’s at an event Monday through Saturday or if it’s for them to show up for the first time to be ready to catch, to being ready to respond, to be ready to receive, that’s going to be the best position you can put yourself in or somebody who’s managing that online experience.

Jay Kranda:

One of the things that we’ve realized is just within our audience, people could watch on our desktop, laptop, mobile app. We got TV apps, Youtube. If you did at like a heat overlay of our website, the number one button that people press is full screen. So most of the people that are consuming our content is in full screen. So we spent a lot of time on our design and it’s nice and it works for engagement. But most people they’ll say, hey, photo response card. It’s right here. So a lot of people think like lower thirds. I’m like, no, everybody’s full screen. So something that we’ve realized that we’ve started to do is just to kind of throw out, hey, like if you watch online, use something like if you want saddleback’s online service, something that I say verbatim pretty much is like, ‘hey, thanks for watching online. You can fill out a response card or you can email online@saddleback.com’ and by even having easy action call like that. So somebody watched it on Facebook. What you want is you want them to go, ‘how do I contact?’ so they can private message. They can comment below or email online@saddleback.com and that’s what we do even with Youtube at the end of our messages on Youtube, there’s a 30 second pitch for me. Or say, ‘hey, thanks for watching on Youtube this week. I want to challenge you to get into community.’ And the next step because I can’t give them a response card.

Mingo Palacios:

Because they’re full screen.

Jay Kranda:

They’re not going to go to the description and click on a link. They might, but it’s a very low percentage. But online@saddleback.com is an easy, memorable way

Mingo Palacios:

Something they can remember. Even after the watching, he can remember that you can hit it. Now, do me a favor because you know, as much as I’d like to just unpack everything and have like an all day conversation, dig into some of your survey questions and some of the results so that you can provide a little bit of clarity for folks if they’re asking maybe some of the same questions, you can give them a little bit of a tension release in a sense in comparison to maybe a hundred other churches that you said you had surveyed.

Jay Kranda:

Yeah. And so my big heart with this, and I’m actually still kind of crunching the day that this was kind of an initial thing that I was kind of looking at is there’s a lot of opinions about online ministry. There’s a lot of thoughts. The church online platform that a bunch of churches developed. There’s churches like Elevation, Life Church, Westside Family Church, they made this platform. So they made this platform. And it just turned 10 years old. So most people doing online ministry are using this platform. There’s a lot of people doing stuff, but there’s not a lot of here’s what’s working and what’s not.

Mingo Palacios:

Here’s some empirical data.

Jay Kranda:

So I surveyed 100 churches doing online ministry, trying to figure out here’s what’s working, here’s what’s not.

Mingo Palacios:

You heard it here first folks, you heard it here first breaking news, breaking news, right?

Jay Kranda:

I love that. Um, yeah. So a couple things that stood out is, one of the first things was 51 percent of the people that we serve, we’re reaching at least 500 people weekly and only less than one percent over 10,000. And really the trend was most people were reaching the same amount of people that they were reaching locally. So the amount of people coming to your church, you kind of on average it was, we were reaching that many people. And so it’s like if you’re reaching 25,000 people locally than really you can pretty easily over time attain that same number online. About only 27 percent had an online pastor.

Mingo Palacios:

Interesting. So you’ve got a lot of consumers without a shepherd.

Jay Kranda:

Exactly, exactly. And I think that’s generally like what do we do with them and how do we position it? Only, and this is actually the number that really encouraged me, only point zero two percent said that their local attendance was impacted negatively.

Mingo Palacios:

Interesting. Oh, and that’s a big fear is fear. If we put our stuff on line, nobody’s gonna want to come.

Jay Kranda:

No one’s going to come. I don’t believe it.

Mingo Palacios:

I don’t believe it either.

Jay Kranda:

But um, I think it only grows it, but you know, I don’t know.

Mingo Palacios:

Like you said, it’s only from your own lens and your own experience, but this with a hundred churches impacted less than one percent said that it impacted their growth in the building negatively.

Jay Kranda:

Majority of them, about 95 percent had been doing ministry for at least a year and then 21 percent said that they actually saw growth of their local attendance since launching their online ministry. And this is actually something that encouraged me highly, 67 percent noticed that people would watch online and then show up physically. They were seeing a direct correlation between launching this kind of Facebook live or something on the chat platform. And then it lead them. And then just real quick, 23 percent saw giving increased. The actually saw launching an online campus and online ministry, they actually 23 percent saw they’re giving directly. There’s a lot of people who weren’t sure, but 23 percent actually said, no, no, no, we directly saw an impact. And then this is where we’re kind of talking about before is that 19 percent are considering using online ministry. They’re talking about it to launch future churches or campuses.

Mingo Palacios:

Right. They’re using it as a strategy for physical growth, infrastructure type growth. So many of those statistics are so encouraging and I feel like a lot of them were like myth busters. Yeah. People are like, no, it’s going to do this or it’s going to do that. The data is clearly showing that there are a lot of benefits if managed well and if managed with a purpose I started to hate like beating a Piñata that way, but it’s true. You, when holding a digital strategy with a purpose, you can actually use it for a lot of momentum and a lot of good where you may not be able to yield the same results by just having people come and go physically. Right. As we wrap up, tell me what would be some of the best pieces of advice for somebody who is, and I think this is probably going to be the majority of our crowd. They’re running a live stream of their services, but they’re yet to really staff it or back it with a pastor. What would be your advice for those who are streaming but not managing it to its fullest potential.

Jay Kranda:

Yeah, I would say right off the bat, make sure you have some kind of response engagement type of deal there. And I think that’s where a lot of people are dispensing a lot of amazing information, but there is no correlation between what they’re streaming and how to get somebody physically responding. I think I would not just with live streaming, but all your content and you know, I think about all the churches that are putting stuff on stuff on Youtube and so forth where people are having, you know, God is moving, you know, I could watch a message from pastor rick two years from now that, that got recorded two years ago. And you know, the question is how do I respond to that message?

Mingo Palacios:

That’s great. That’s the best first question. How do people respond?

Jay Kranda:

So, with all your live streaming and everything, just make sure if it’s a link in there, a link to a digital response card and email address to talk more. But I would say the number one thing, just make sure all your website and all your content that you create is there. It’s an opportunity to generate leads and you’ve got to make sure, do you have something for them to follow up? So Amazon’s great at this. All these companies are great at and I think a lot of churches we struggled with what’s the next step? And I just want to make sure if it’s a live stream on Youtube, it’s something on your website. Make sure that there is a response card or some kind of engagement so somebody can get connected and, and the. The easier that response correlates with the media, the more likely they’re going to follow it. So yeah. Hey, I have a contact us thing on our website. Yeah, but if they just washed this message about getting into a group, they’re not looking at contacting us.

Mingo Palacios:

And they’re not connecting the dots between those two. You have to make it very specific. The response has to be specific to the content.

Jay Kranda:

And so I would say right off the bat, just make sure you have, you know, as simple as replicate your response card or your local church and put it out your church’s website slash and create it. And then have that forward to somebody who can follow up. So how have a response card I think is the number one thing. And then I would highly recommend as you move forward, talk about, how do you integrate the strategies into your overall strategy? Because I really believe that it’s a both and strategy and it used to be online ministry was this like well, should we do it? Well now the thing is everybody, we’re reaching everybody. If you draw up your Saddleback Sam or whoever your target is, that person is on the Internet.

Mingo Palacios:

Guaranteed.

Jay Kranda:

So they are on the Internet.

Mingo Palacios:

Unless your core audience is eighty five year old people.

Jay Kranda:

But you know, the funny thing that I always tell people, I had a online small group hosts who is 91 years old.

Mingo Palacios:

No, you stop it. That’s awesome.

Jay Kranda:

No, no no. She actually hosted five small groups. I found out about this later. She’s like, ‘I’m running five groups because I just want to reach people.’ And she was like, ‘I can’t get people to fill it.’ And I didn’t have the heart to tell her that. I don’t think her friends wanted to join her influence grew up totally warranted, but she is so passionate. But that’s the funny thing is technology is not an age thing. It’s just a trait. So like people that, you know, the Internet has been around so long now that you know, wherever the Internet is in like 20 years. Like my kids might be better at it than me, but I’m still going to love technology and so it is a little bit of a love language. I would think you have to be talking about this stuff because your community, it’s part of their life.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah. There’s nobody right now, especially who are coming to age. If you’re trying to engage the next generation and you don’t have a strategy for online, you’ve got a big mess that you have to figure out how to fill in. The easiest way I would say to get the ball moving is just to engage somebody in that age range and give them just a few nickels and say, how would you reach your friends? How would you reach your peers through this medium? As we wrap up, I just want to say thanks for sharing a little bit of wisdom. How, if we’re going to glean from you more Jay, how would we be able to reach you or are there some things that you’re teeing up, more thoughts through our listeners can track you down with?

Jay Kranda:

Yeah. So for sure that the online, I would say pastor community is very rich. It’s actually one of the benefits as people share a lot of information. So it’s an open book community and so there’s actually a really great Facebook group of a bunch of online ministries that I would love if you want to check it out, contact me and I’ll share that. But there’s a group that always just sharing stuff that’s working or not. And it’s been around for like eight years. Like right when actually I think Facebook group started right around there. They jumped in really early on. But I actually have a free course where I talk about how to do online ministry in a healthy way. I’m on my website, JayKranda.com and so it’s free. There’s no, I’m not selling anything.

Mingo Palacios:

Perfect.

Jay Kranda:

It’s all free and I would love to talk to you more. I care passionately about the church utilizing this amazing resource in a healthy way and there’s a way to use it where you’re reaching people online and you’re driving them physically. And there can be a way to do this where it’s not a, it’s not dangerous, but it’s actually healthy.

Mingo Palacios:

I love that. Jay. Thank you so much for sharing your wisdom. Thanks for sharing some of the survey data here. Again, always breaking current news on the PD Cast. Jay, thanks for your time. For all of our listeners, thanks for listening in, we appreciate you and we’ll talk to you guys soon.

PERSON #2

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Episode 003: Working Online Viewers Into Your Existing Strategy
Episode 002: Building a Microsite Team

Episode 002: Building a Microsite Team

EPISODE 002: BUILDING A MICROSITE TEAM

In this episode we cover the core roles needed to launch a microsite, and detail each role for greater clarity. Learn how to develop multipliable teams that are experienced and healthy. Hosted by Mingo and Esli. @micrositeguy and @micrositegirl

EPISODE RESOURCES

Check out the links & resources mentioned in this episode:

  1. Esli’s Instagram: @micrositegirl
  2. Mingo’s Instagram: @micrositeguy
  3. Facebook: @eslibonita
  4. Twitter: @eslibonita

MEMORABLE QUOTES FROM THE EPISODE

DOWNLOAD THE TRANSCRIPT

Grab your reading glasses and download the PDF here.

EPISODE 002 FULL TEXT TRANSCRIPT

Mingo Palacios:

Hey everybody in studio with Jonathan Allen and Esli Medrano for episode number two of the Microsite Ministry Podcasts. It’s been a desire of mine over the last several years to figure out a medium by which we can share all of these leadership tools and all the ideas that are around micro-sites since it’s still a new conversation. It’s still a new idea for most churches and it’s something that a lot of churches can incorporate quickly I think. So the podcast, this conversation, is really out there to help educate leaders inside the church about how to build Microsites well and how to lead them healthily. That’s what we want. So, Esli and I would both agree anybody can launch a Microsite, but there are very few people who can manage them well so that they grow accordingly, developing both the people that attend them and the leaders who lead them. So, that’s what this conversation is about. That’s what this podcast is about. Today, specifically, we’ll be talking about the mechanics of a team, the roles on a team since Microsites can go anywhere and serve any grouping of people. You’ve got to have a plan in your mind for how you’re going to lead your Microsite well. Today we’re going to talk about the key roles inside of what we believe is a strong Microsite team. So, Esli, why don’t you get us started with the optimal number of people who we would say, we know you can run lower than this. We know you can run higher than this by number of people, but what’s the optimal number of people to run a Microsite?

Esli Medrano:

I would say it’s eight.

Mingo Palacios:

Eight? That’s more than I would think.

Esli Medrano:

Well it’s four of the team and then the four that are being discipled in case something happens.

Mingo Palacios:

Discipleship instantly in the mind of a team, not for the sake of getting your church out to a place where people can hear it but for the sake of developing new leaders. So eight. I would go with your answer since you’re, the pro. Since you’ve been doing Microsites almost twice as long as I’ve been doing them. So unpack it, tell me why eight.

Esli Medrano:

So, we have four roles in Microsites and we still have since you started it so we still have the team leader who-

Mingo Palacios:

This is logistics.

Esli Medrano:

This is all logistics for all my OCD people.

Mingo Palacios:

This is you. You and the team would be operating as the team leader is somebody who loves numbers. Somebody who loves, not like you’re chasing them, but you’re like, “Ooh, I get to organize data.”

Esli Medrano:

Spreadsheets.

Mingo Palacios:

I remember when we were doing our discipleship stuff, you came with binders for all of our people, right? That is a team leader. Can you think of while you’re listening to this, of somebody who loves to make binders, who loves a label maker, who loves to get into the spreadsheet, who loves to read and analyze the data?

Esli Medrano:

Who can communicate to everybody what’s going on, what’s happening, what’s not happening.

Mingo Palacios:

Somebody who’s very consistent. Somebody who’s reliable in the sense that you go, “Hey, every Friday we need to send an email out that person. Instantly instead of saying, “I’ll do it,” they go, “let me put it on my calendar. Let me set a reminder. I’ll have an automatic blah, blah, blah.” That is the makeup of a team leader and that’s my cell phone ringing. There you go. Boo.

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Episode 001: Defining a Microsite

EPISODE 001: DEFINING A MICROSITE

Learn what a microsite is, why it’s distinctly different than a typical outreach or multisite, and who it has the potential to serve. Hosted by Mingo and Esli. @micrositeguy & @micrositegirl

EPISODE RESOURCES

Check out the links & resources mentioned in this episode:

  1. Facebook: @eslibonita
  2. Twitter: @eslibonita

MEMORABLE QUOTES FROM THE EPISODE

DOWNLOAD THE TRANSCRIPT

Grab your reading glasses and download the PDF here.

EPISODE 001 FULL TEXT TRANSCRIPT

Mingo Palacios:

Hey everybody, welcome to this episode of the Microsite Ministry Podcast. This is actually our first episode as I’m sitting across the table from my dear friend, she Esli Madrano who prior to us hitting record, we just settled across the table that Esli is now the resident professional at micro-sites because while I only ran the project for three years, Esli has been in it for two and a half of those three years plus two years now that you’ve been the official Microsite pastor at the Rock Church.

Esli Medrano:

So now I’m the pro.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s why I’m interviewing you today that I’m not even interviewing myself. I’m interviewing you.

Esli Medrano:

That would be awkward.

Mingo Palacios:

That would be a terrible interview. But for all of our listeners, we’re doing this in two different formats. We’ve got just the audio format that we’re doing for podcasts, but we also have the video version. So if you have the audio version and not the video version, I’m going to tell you to go find those somewhere maybe on youtube but this is going to be a conversation. Today in this episode we’re going to talk about what a microsite is and what kind of church ought to consider doing a microsite. Really the goal is to get people educated on the topic of micro-sites because a lot of conversation about what’s next in the church and then to really have a healthy assessment of whether or not it can work inside of your ministry. Right? That’s fair. I know several because we’ve helped out so many churches launch microsites, there’s all these different versions. There’s other people that are doing things that are like micro-sites, that aren’t microsites. Honestly they all play, but for us in this conversation, Esli and I will be talking about the microsite movement that we started five almost six years ago. April would be six years to my knowledge from when we started it. Anyways, welcome to the show. Esli, nice to have you. Thanks for coming up and doing the drive today.

Esli Medrano:

Love it. Thank you guys.

Mingo Palacios:

So Esli, you are the active micro-site, pastor for the Rock Church. That’s your official full time job and focus.

Esli Medrano:

Right.

Mingo Palacios:

Tell me when a church asks you what is a microsite Esli or when you go to a party and you are talking about what you do with your nine to five, 40 hour work week, which is more like probably 60 hours of a work week.

Esli Medrano:

Eighty.

Mingo Palacios:

What do you tell people when they ask, “what does a microsite?”

Esli Medrano:

It depends on who is asking, right? But I always say it’s just church without walls. That’s my first opener. I can see their eyes open and be like, OK what?

Mingo Palacios:

They start to think, right?

Esli Medrano:

What do you mean church without walls. It’s like, yeah, we go out there where the people are and we have church.

Mingo Palacios:

There’s a ministry called Church Without Walls.

Esli Medrano:

True. That’s true.

Mingo Palacios:

Church without walls takes trained teachers, bible study teachers. They prepare a lesson but this is distinctly different than Church Without Walls because we’re utilizing and leveraging technology. Right?

Esli Medrano:

Right. So when I get their attention, then I start telling them that it’s a projector, a screen, a tent, chairs and then we just have church there.

Mingo Palacios:

And that really starts to get people’s minds moving right?

Esli Medrano:

They go, what do you mean? What do you do with a projector? Well, you know, the church that I’m at, we live stream, so we livestream the service. So we have from worship to the service and altar call and then we just have church at the park or at the beach.

Mingo Palacios:

Right. Anywhere where people are willing to take it and find a group of people to serve with it. And its aim is so diverse. Over the five years that we’ve seen microsites go out and come back every single week. I’ve seen them connect to homeless communities, low income communities, elderly communities. At one point we were trying to get a microsite into a strip club, which was super crazy. Not for the people that attended the strip club as customers, but for the ladies who were working it. I mean the idea that there are a tight-knit community that may not have the courage to go to a church. We thought maybe we could bring a church to them. Not me. It would have been you, but what are some of the other communities that micro-sites have served as you’ve led microsites?

Esli Medrano:

So now we’re in the prison community, we’re in the juvenile halls that-

Mingo Palacios:

Both men’s and women’s boys and girls?

Esli Medrano:

Yeah boys and girls, which are more boys and girls, but yeah, we do have a micro-site that serves the girls. And then we’re also starting to get into the jails as well, like the county-

Mingo Palacios:

County jail.

Esli Medrano:

Yeah local, very local and the reason is because then they’re there. They have no church so ones that can’t get out of there, there’s a church waiting for them.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s a great way to see it. I think of historically we’ve run in AA, in partnership with AA community. Like GA would be Gamblers Anonymous. AA Alcoholics Anonymous. NA Narcotics Anonymous. Anywhere there is public facilities where people are coming together to move forward in their life, right? To move forward. That’s been a great partnership with a micro-site. I think of the military community is a huge one, right? All the different variations of how we did military communities.

Esli Medrano:

Yeah overseas, we were in a cargo ship inside. So for like three, four months, they had church in somewhere in-

Mingo Palacios:

In the ocean?

Esli Medrano:

Yeah

Mingo Palacios:

On like a fleet ship.

Esli Medrano:

What is it when they leave?

Mingo Palacios:

Deployed.

Esli Medrano:

Yeah they got deployed. And they’re like ok we need church. All right we’ll bring the church with us. There they had it.

Mingo Palacios:

I remember a couple of times we sent out equipment with the families that we’d be moving out of state. So, you know, they were long loving church families that wanted to carry the community and the message to their new location. So we sent one to Hawaii. We had one in Minnesota-

Esli Medrano:

LA not too far.

Mingo Palacios:

LA was another one. So microsites positioned themselves, at least as we have had our hands on it, as a thing around groups of people that we know exist that don’t have a church or that no church has made itself available to them to belong to. I always told people that when I thought of microsites, I thought of it as expanding the walls of the church that we wanted to give everyone an opportunity to belong. Even if there was no local church there a microsite could be kind of like the ATM. We always talked about banks and ATMs and the bank is kind of like the full service of financial opportunities. But you can put an ATM anywhere for somebody to get what they need when they need it.

Esli Medrano:

Yeah. When I explain it, you know, with other pastors, because they always come to me and they asked me, so what’s so good about it? Why would we do it instead of maybe a multi-site? Well, I always give them the idea or just the little nugget that is like, hey, there’s a lot of people that did not know you are open. There’s a lot of people, they have no idea that there’s a church in this street. So if you have a micro-site, and just kind of promoting your church one, and two is getting people from the outside that are broken. I mean, we’ve seen several stories that you and I back in the day, the people that didn’t even want to sit on the chair because they feel so unworthy of being at a church.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah they sat right on the curb or just outside the fence where we were streaming.

Esli Medrano:

Or on the floor. So many times we’ve sat with them on the floor so they wouldn’t feel like they weren’t intruding. Yeah. So there’s a lot of people that are out there that had been hurt by the church, they have been-

Mingo Palacios:

Rejected. A past experience for whatever reason, not enough self confidence or self worth to walk in the door. And that’s what makes a microsite beautiful as a micro-site will walk up to that person.

Esli Medrano:

Yeah. And so easy and not intrusive. We’re in the middle of nowhere. There’s no walls, there’s no nothing. If you don’t really want to be that close to us, you don’t have to. The speakers are really loud enough.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah. You can be in earshot.

Esli Medrano:

It can be loud enough for you to hear what’s going on. And that’s the beauty of it. And the beauty about it also is it, for example, that people that we know, we’re talking about the communities that we would have these micro-sites at, but there’s other communities that I have my eyes on. For example, the sex offenders, they cannot go to a church. I know in San Diego there’s only three churches, they provide some sort of a service.

Mingo Palacios:

Some sort of opportunity, right?

Esli Medrano:

Yeah. And that doesn’t mean on Sundays. Some time some day.

Mingo Palacios:

Somewhere in an organized fashion. I get that. That makes sense.

Esli Medrano:

And I don’t know what the percentage is of people they are in that category, but I, you know, they need Jesus too. So what a way to get to them.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s one of the things that I remember talking about when we were having to explain what it was that was in our minds when we’re talking about microsites was the idea about temples and wells in the new testament. I’ll paint a picture for our audience, for our listeners. A Jesus spent significant amounts of time at both the temple teaching, right? People who are comfortable in that arena and in that space. And he spent just as much time inside and around the, well probably less time inside the well, but more time around the well. And a different yet equally important ministry happened around that space. I think coming out of a church that was at the time I think was running like 14,000 people bouncing off that 15,000 person mark, we were opening multi-sites. I felt like setting up a multi-site was like setting up another temple, but man, there were so many community wells where people came together for something they needed, whether or not it was, you know, whether it was actually good for them or not. If it was at a bar, if it was at a hookah lounge, if it was that for this case it was at that strip club, or if it was around their local community center, I just felt like seeing the wells as opportunities to launch micro, we were going to have the same significance of ministry just with a totally different population. So like you said, people who weren’t comfortable coming to the temple per se, but still wanted to have a real encounter with Jesus, whether they knew him by name or not.

Esli Medrano:

We have all the churches in San Diego and I can say that most of the churches have outreaches. So it’s not that the church is not doing its work, but it’s different when it comes to microsites because it’s actually giving them the taste of a church service will be like. So there’s a difference between the outreach and micro-site. Yeah outreach you can go give food to the homeless and then preach to them a little bit witness and minister.

Mingo Palacios:

Or witness or go visit. You can do visitations, right?

Esli Medrano:

But microsite is different because you’re bringing the church outside so you’re bringing what church looks like and then it’s super easy for people to transition from a microsite to a real campus.

Mingo Palacios:

Because they’re comfortable. They can identify the pastor.

Esli Medrano:

Yep.

Mingo Palacios:

They know the music, it gives them a chance to get comfortable. If some people have never been to a church or haven’t been to church in a long time sometimes it’s like, it’s that stepping stone. It’s a gateway, if you will, into the larger brick and mortar campus. Right? When we talk about what a microsite is, right? The fact that it’s church without walls. I love that you made the distinction against it not just being outreached because oftentimes with outreach you have a bunch of people intending to do good for the purpose of teaching somebody about Jesus, but we always forget to teach people about Jesus. Right? So we’d go out and we want a food drive or we want, clothing drive.

Esli Medrano:

Feed the homeless.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah. We’re going to do a military day where we serve the military and you wait for the preacher or some teacher or you wait for somebody who’s designated, who is going to stop and give the message I love about a micro-site that it says, “hey, you matter where you’re at and you matter so much that we actually want to bring the best of what our church does right to where you’re at.” That is distinctly different than outreach and it can live for a while. Microsites as an organization on the org chart lived in the outreach ministries, but we’ve decided and discovered over time between my hands and your hands that it sits better in the campus family, correct?

Esli Medrano:

It does, yeah. Because not only are we just stuck in the outreach and the whole saving part, only you’re just saving, saving people, saving, saving, saving something, Gospel, Gospel, Gospel, but we’re actually equipping and we’re sending. So if you are in a microsite and you’re helping set up the chair, you come or how you’ve come to the microsite early, then you’re going to be part of the team. We’re equipping you to do something for the Lord, and then, hey, maybe one of these days you’re going to go and open another microsite somewhere else.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah. And in the next episode we’ll talk about the team dynamics of what it takes to build a micro-site team. Stay tuned for episode two. But just so that people understand that you should and you can, as time goes on and you unveil micro-sites in your community, it helps to maybe start it looking like an outreach ministry, but eventually as quickly as you can start looking at it like a campus. And some of you guys who are listening, if you’ve never, your church has yet to become a multi site church. Right? Maybe you have one location. This is a great tester. It’s a great, almost like a scout you can send out to see if there is potential for another group of people to be watching alongside of the people that are coming together. Now let’s. Oh, you’re thinking about something. What are you thinking about?

Esli Medrano:

Yeah. I don’t know if I want to say because I always tell the campuses that come to, I mean all the churches that come, I get emails all the time, how do I start microsites at my church? I always say just started as a campus because you yes, it’s an outreach. The first thing you’re going to do is outreach.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s the language. It helps people understand how it looks.

Esli Medrano:

How it looks. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. You’ve always got to think about the outreach, but almost immediately you want to think of the equipping. Because the next episode we’re going to talk about the teams, but microsites always had in our heads the discipling part ever since you walked into a microsite, there’s the team always finding areas to disciple others. So I don’t know, to me-

Mingo Palacios:

Well the discipleship also happens inside the team dynamic too, right? And that’s the biggest part. You can’t start a great microsite without a great team and so that discipleship is necessary. But I do like how you said, if you’re listening to this podcast and you’re, you’re trying to figure out how to set it up so that you can pitch a microsite to your team, you’re going to want to paint the picture. You know actually what I tell people all the time, it’s like a missions trip. It’s like missions. Because when you go on a missions trip, you know what you have to get done. You just have no idea how you’re going to do it. You know what the end goal is, but you have to deal with all of the scenarios and all the unexpected things that come in and mess up your plan. But you know the end goal is that people are going hear about Jesus and people are going to be served, right? So actually scratch all that we just said about how you paint the picture, if you can imagine it like a missions trip, just five miles down the road where the product or the thing you’re delivering is a taste of the sermon, full set worship, tithing-

Esli Medrano:

Altar call.

Mingo Palacios:

Altar call if your church does that, the next steps, if you can imagine it being a missions trip where the final product is people getting to experience getting a taste of your church’s Sunday program. That’s basically a microsite.

Esli Medrano:

That’s pretty much it. And really the pastor is doing all the work. You are there receiving, you’re there catching you’re there explaining.

Mingo Palacios:

Loving people, developing people.

Esli Medrano:

You don’t have to worry about-

Mingo Palacios:

We love on people. We love people.

Esli Medrano:

We still love on people. That’s weird. Love people.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah when you love on people, it’s without definition. But we want to love people specifically. Microsites help you do that. Thank you. We still hold that value.

Esli Medrano:

Oh yeah yeah we still do that.

Mingo Palacios:

I love also, ultimately for a church that’s considering it, you don’t. Size is irrelevant. Oh, no. Sizes are relevant at the end of the day. Actually now years later, it’s easier to do a microsite than it was when we started the whole process because it was tens of thousands of dollars to get a high definition stream inside your sanctuary to be pumping a reliable signal remember of the days when like signals would drop and thanks to Mark Zuckerberg and Facebook, that guy’s piloted and helped the church move forward in ways like we could’ve never paid for on our own. So now you can have a person’s phone. They can be streaming right off of their phone and other people, you can set up a page and then people anywhere can sign in in a remote location. Put It on a big screen tv like we’ve got in the studio here, pump it through a projector or if you get a big enough ipad. The ipad jumbo now is like my first TV. It’s about the same size. You can have a church service.

Esli Medrano:

Yeah there’s no reason why churches are not doing this. We’ll talk about this in another one, but it’s so easy to have micro-sites now.

Mingo Palacios:

You shock people with the simplicity of it and that’s what’s funny is people try to make it so much more difficult than it actually is, so much more complicated than it is, and actually microsites have made church incredibly simple. It’s really-

Esli Medrano:

It’s cheap too.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah. It’s so affordable. It’s stripped away a lot of the preconceived things that we think we have to have in order to have a Jesus moment in order to build people and you can. You can do it bare bones if the team is committed to the people they’re reaching.

Esli Medrano:

And it’s so easy just to know that the team is all on board. The team is ready to go and catch those people and guide them to the right place to go. Last year we have 700, over 700 souls.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s crazy. Between how many sites? Just so people have a context. 13 sites yielding 700 decisions for Christ within the year. Unbelievable statistics. I remember going backwards in the years that the multiplicity in it is unbelievable. It is a leadership engine. It’s a team’s engine. It cultivates a bravery in the people that volunteer because they’re getting out of their comfort zones. I always told pastors if you’ve got people who are really antsy in their seats because they’re not feeling they’re getting fed where they’re not getting enough out of you, send them out with a microsite and tell them, this is your mission field now. You’re co-pastoring in this with us, and we used to talk about the difference between takers and partakers, right? People who aren’t fed, you’re taking from the church, you’re taking from the pastor. The minute you become a partaker in this ministry.

Esli Medrano:

You learn.

Mingo Palacios:

You learn and you lead and you suffer, but it for good reason for.

Esli Medrano:

Your car suffers.

Mingo Palacios:

Yeah, your car suffers. Esli, for the closing comment in this episode, what would you tell somebody who’s listening, who’s on the fence thinking about a microsite but doesn’t know how they’re going to bring it to their team or even if they’re able to do it or they have the skills to do it, what do you tell that person?

Esli Medrano:

I would honestly say that it is very easy to get one microsite started. One microsite. Super easy. With this podcast, we’re going to learn the little things here and there. Do not hear the enemy not wanting to get out of the temple and you’ll go to the well. Do not listen to the enemy because you are a threat. Once you’re out there, you’re a threat.

Mingo Palacios:

That’s good, man. I can think of so many times that we were met with opposition because we showed up in a place the devil didn’t want us to be because the good news was going out in public and bouncing off the walls.

Esli Medrano:

We have stories for days.

Mingo Palacios:

Pizza, multiplying. I would say for another episode, I would say this, you’re in the right track. If you’re listening to this, you’re going down the right track and it may not be this month. It may not be this week, but I’m telling you, if you’re thinking about microsites, your heart’s in the right spot. Any time you are considering another avenue by which somebody is going to get to hear about Jesus or experience the local church for the first time in the right light, I mean lots can go wrong, but that’s so right. Programmatically and systematically and you know if your church is going to be OK with it or not, it’s worth the fight. If at the end of the day somebody can hear about Jesus who has yet to hear about him and microsites over and over and over again over the last five years, going on six years has really proven that the fight is worth it. So, Esli, thank you so much. Thanks for being a part of episode one. We’re going to have you back for episode two as we keep this conversation going. In the next episode, we’re going to talk about the team dynamics, how to build a team that will thrive in microsites. Also, if you want to follow along with some of the things that are happening in Esli’s world, you can catch her at microsite girl, and you can catch me at microsite guy. Hey. We should be brother and sister, we are brother and sister. We’ve suffered long enough with this ministry.

Esli Medrano:

We’re Mexicans.

Mingo Palacios:

Microsites and Mexicans go well together. That’s all I know. So anyways, I love you guys. Thanks for listening and share this if it helps you, I think it’s got so many applicable dynamics for leadership anyways ways I think fit inside of any conversation, but Esli, thanks for sharing your heart with microsites. For our listeners, will talk to you soon.

Episode 001: Defining a Microsite